Busking bylaws. The facts.

                          Street performance and Dublin City Council bylaws

There is a group of individuals who claim they represent all buskers who have been putting out  misinformation, not just about Dublin City Council, but about me in an unjust and inaccurate attempt to demonise and label me as anti-busking and anti-culture. This is not true.

Firstly, nobody, is attempting or has suggested banning busking or street performance.  At present, there is a document in the public domain seeking observations and suggestions with regards how we manage the public domain in relation to street performance. This is part of the democratic process of enshrining the rights of street performers while on the other hand maintaining a balance in the public domain which is also the workplace and home for thousands of people.

Over the years many residents and workers have complained to Dublin City Council and public representatives about the unbearable noise levels at certain locations in the city – mainly Grafton Street, Temple Bar, Henry Street and the GPO.

Having tried a voluntary code of conduct with regards performers’ noise levels, the City Council  decided it was appropriate to create a series of bylaws to help to manage the public domain more effectively.  These bylaws were enacted into law a year ago with a review period that would fix any blaring omissions or further complaints. 

The concerns at present mainly relate to amplification and noise levels and a general wish by many residents and workers to ban amplification which, as well as being a nuisance, drowns out acoustic buskers.  I am not against busking, but, like the residents and workers in the city centre, I  support this ban on amplification. 

This whole process has been democratic, open and transparent where everyone gets heard – unlike on Grafton Street or Temple Bar sometimes when you can only hear the noise that is so loud your head hurts. Anybody interested can read a copy of the new bylaws under consideration before they are voted upon and the voting process itself can be viewed by all when they are discussed at length in Dublin City Council at the Arts Strategic Policy Committee which is webcast live and available online to view after the meeting also.

Rest assured that Street performance and busking will always be a feature on Dublin and Irish streets and Irish culture is the richer for it.

I hope this clarifies some of the issues, even if it doesn’t stop the devious few who want to undermine me and who last year smashed the window of my former studio on Ormond Quay and graffitied disgusting comments all over the building.

Long live busking. Long live street performance. Long live a safe and healthy work place for all.

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One thought on “Busking bylaws. The facts.

  1. Hi Mannix – I really hope you get elected to the Dail, thanks for the above information. I am managing musicians and bands etc for 30 years. I feel that street music is an essential part of the culture and charm of Dublin as I know you do too. Buy I feel that banning amplified music ( of any sort) is just too crude, unfair and not even desirable to ban all amplified music in the city centre. May I suggest that a better idea would be to allow amplification up to an acceptable level where it will not cause offence to the vast majority of people. The amplified music can be allowed in certain designated areas of Dublin City Centre. Then have other areas that are designated for purely acoustic. There can be a noise limit put on the output so that nothing too loud is allowed. There are pretty inexpensive portable sound / decibel metres that certain City council enforcers and police can carry to measure anything that may seem too loud Not all amplified music is that loud as you have indicated here.

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