Historic Monument- 21 Aungier Street

Aungier Street 21 After

21 Aungier Street, Dublin.  

No 21 Aungier Street is designated under 4 different legal principles; National Monuments and Sites Act, Article 38 protecting all original materials and use, Section 19 Revenue Act amortising costs against tax and access to the public, 2000 planning and Development act on the list of the RPS (Record of Protected Structure)

  • 1992 the building was recognised by Dublin Civic Trust as a late 17th century building.  It was reported to the relevant department and was given status – protective status under the monument and sites act and registered as a National Monument.
  • 1995 The Bord Pleanala reversed the demolition order on it.  Because of its status, an appeal was made to the word and the Bord reversed the decision by DCC and the building was vested in the ownership of the Dublin Civic Trust.
  • 1995-97 Research to prove historic and material significance – the dating of timber frame walls which are very early.  The timber dating of the early staircase to 1680. This is the only full staircase of its kind going up 4 floors with 6 turns in it – it has early pear shaped balustrades the same as the ones in the Royal Hospital.

Number 21 Aungier Street is a substantial late 17th-century mansion one of the oldest recorded buildings in the city, a structure of outstanding architectural and historical significance, built during the 1660s on lands leased by Sir Francis Aungier to Robert Reading, Esq., an influential colleague of the Duke of Ormond, and was subsequently home to the Earls of Rosse, supporters of King James II at the Battle of the Boyne.

The building is a rare surviving example in Dublin of the transition in building technology from late medieval timber framing to brick and masonry construction.

It substantially retains its original plan and layout, consisting of four rooms, arranged around a centrally positioned staircase and two massive chimney stacks, flanked by smaller closet rooms.

The internal walls are timber-framed and are similar in character to those found in Numbers 9- 9A Aungier Street, a 17th-century mansion that has more recently come to light, a building  recognised for its rarity by Dublin City Council, conservation department.

The staircase in No.21 survives intact, it rises six flights through the building, featuring squared newels, a wide heavy handrail and handsome pear-shaped balusters characteristic of the late 17th century and is the only means of accessing the upper floors.

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Original staircase before renovation

 

Renovation of the building

 

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21 Aungier Street in 1991

 

In 1992, planning permission was granted for demolition of the building, which was subsequently overturned by An Bord Pleanála in acknowledgement of the mansion’s outstanding architectural significance. Through Dublin Civic Trust’s intervention, (then) Dublin Corporation arranged for a site swap with the developer who had originally purchased it from the Corporation, and subsequently vested the property in Dublin Civic Trust in 1995.

The Dublin Civic Trust undertook a major year-long programme of structural stabilisation, conservation and restoration as a pioneering built heritage demonstration project, which was grant aided by Dublin Corporation and the Department of Environment.

This included extensive steel and masonry bracing, reinstating the roof, repointing the late Georgian façade of c.1810, salvaging and refurbishing all original joinery elements, lime plaster wall and ceiling repairs, and the careful reinstatement of windows to exact historic profiles. A stand-out element of the works was the meticulous consolidation and repair of the rare original staircase and timber-framed walls.

Upon completion of the essential conservation works, Dublin Civic Trust sold the property under our Revolving Fund Scheme to a private owner who undertook to complete the building and operate it as a 15-bedroom heritage guesthouse with associated café at ground floor level. The grant of permission for this use (Ref: 2678/96), which operated until approximately the year 2000, was conditioned on reasonable public access being afforded to the first-floor level, in addition to full public access at ground floor level. Under the same grant, a planning condition required an agreement to be signed under Section 38 of the Local Government (Planning and Development) Act 1963 (amended) stipulating the preservation of the original staircase, original timber beams and medieval timber partitions, original free standing chimney stacks, and the restored front and rear walls. A further condition requested that “no further subdivisions of the important ground and first floors shall be permitted.”

  • On completion of the restoration in 1997 the Dublin Civic Trust – the building was launched by the then minister Liz Mc Manus – a section 38 agreement was drawn up protecting all original material identified and stating that this would not be removed or interfered with in the foreseeable future – this was signed by Dublin Corporation.
  • Section 19 under the Revenue act was obtained on the building which entitled a would-be purchaser to amortise the restoration costs against their tax liability. This was subsequently used by the new owner.

Since approximately the year 2000 Number 21 was pressed into unauthorised use as a long-term hostel providing residential accommodation for the Immigration Service, and latterly to the Department of Justice as a step-down facility for young offenders. This use was in breach of the authorised guesthouse use which afforded public access to the property and facilitated the appreciation and enjoyment of its unique heritage features.

Irish Times, March 2nd 2017: Olivia O Kelly

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/historic-monument-in-dublin-to-be-used-for-the-homeless-1.2994185

Irish Times, March 26th 2017: Olivia O Kelly

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/conversion-of-historic-dublin-building-to-homeless-hostel-stopped-1.3020461

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Pop-the-shop-up 18 Ormond Qy Upper

Final three days of Kamerino – the Catalan pop-up shop being housed at 18 Ormond Quay Upper until Sunday evening (5th March)

Friday: Shop is open tonight until 6.30pm

Saturday: 10am until 1.30pm (closed for workshop 1.30-2.20)

Late night opening Saturday 4th March: 8pm

Workshop:  1.30pm-2.30pm Saturday 4th March  (Paper hat making)

Talk: 3pm Saturday 4th March 2017

Sunday: Final Day – 10am-6pm

 

 

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Hand painted fan  c1910 – Collection Kamerino

 

 

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Kamerino box of tricks

 

Dublin Civic Trust Bookfair Saturday 10th December

Saturday 10th December 2016 from 11am until 5pm, Dublin Civic Trust  who now reside at 18 Ormond Quay Upper Dublin will hold a book sale of their  many publications covering interests from the streets of Dublin to best practice in maintaining your heritage building.

Perfect Christmas gifts, walking tours of Dublin, Conservation and restoration manuals, Trees of Trinity, and many, many more…….

Drop in and get to know the Civic Trust.  They Rock!

bookstore-front

 

 

 

 

Talk by Fiachra MacGabhann- Dundalk

For those of you within driving distance of Dundalk town there will be a very interesting talk given by Fiachra Mac Gabhann this Friday June 10th on Irish Place Names.  It will be well worth attending. No booking needed.

 

kilflynn

Kilflynn, Co Kerry……

 

An Archive of Our Past: Placenames and Sense of Place

Speaker: Fiachra Mac Gabhann

Time: 8.00pm

Venue: Wellington Hall, St. Mary’s Road, Dundalk

Date: Friday, June 10th 2016

Organisers: Dundalk Culture Club

 

Toponymy – the study of Place Names – gives us a fascinating and unique access to our past. It connects us to the landscape and nature and is a well­spring of geographical, historical and mythical information.

Fiachra Mac Gabhann presents a talk that will draw on his extraordinary ten­ volume study of the Place Names of County Mayo, Logainmneacha Mhaigh Eo, to examine some of the intricacies of these themes and piece together some of what has been lost, and offer perspectives on the historical and cultural significance of Irish placenames to our sense of identity.

Admission is Free but donations are welcome. 

This event has been organised by the Dundalk Culture Club.

Conflict + the City – Free talks

Some of you might be interested in this two day conference at Liberty Hall. The event is free but you must register through the email at the bottom of this press release.  It is a public event and open to all.

31st May-June 1st 

List of speakers can be found here: http://conflictandthecity.ie/speakers/

 

CONFLICT + THE CITY – Public Conference in Liberty Hall Theatre  (FREE)

City Wall CHAPTER 5-700x572Dublin City Council’s Heritage Office, in conjunction with UCD Decade of Centenaries, is organising a two-day Public Conference entitled‘Conflict + The City’ in Liberty Hall Theatre. The Conference is aimed at the general public and admission is free.

Over the two days speakers will engage with the audience in discussing the effect of war on the streets and buildings of cities, the rebuilding that then happens and how this affects the way we experience our cities today. Day one will mostly concentrate on Dublin post-rebellion (and post-1922) and then broaden out to look at major cities across Europe with international speakers focusing on Beirut and Berlin. Day two will look at Jerusalem, Belfast, Sarajevo, and the contemporary situation in Calais, for examples.

Speaking about the conference, Charles Duggan, Heritage Officer with Dublin City Council said “This conference is designed for the general public, for anyone who has an interest in Dublin and how the city was rebuilt after the conflicts that took place from 1916 to 1922. But as well as that, we will be placing Dublin in a greater European context and looking at the effect of conflicts on other great European cities. A host of International speakers, together with local experts will deliver talks on an aspect of the city that has yet to be explored.”

Dr. Ellen Rowley of UCD said “Staying in the twentieth century, this two-day public conference will present research into various architectures of war and cities in repair, from Beirut to Blitz-time London; from Cold War bunkers to Belfast’s peace-lines. Today, in Dublin, much of how we move through, spend time in and experience the city comes out of the 1920s reconstruction projects. The scars of conflict and the efforts towards rebuilding resonate through Dublin’s architecture, almost 100 years later.”

ENDS

The conference is free but booking is essential.

For more information see W: www.conflictandthecity.ie

E: heritage@dublincity.ie T: (01) 222 3090

 

Unique Dublin Artefact – John ffrench/Mirolo Mosaic

 

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Mosaic in Boyers Restaurant, Dublin by John ffrench Irish Artist installed by Joe and David Mirolo – (The work is signed 1967)

Boyers of Earl Street is closing its doors for good.  Generations passed through these doors and the place is a wash with memory.  It is important to keep that connection to that memory, to that heritage, to that witness.
In the restaurant of Boyers is a mosaic artwork that many Dubliners over the generations enjoyed.  Too much of this unique work has been previously lost to skips and landfill.  Too many of our unique buildings, streets, have been simply bulldozed and replaced by ugly shopping centres or even uglier office blocks.  A thing of beauty is a joy forever.  This work was installed by Joe and David Mirolo an Italian-Irish family who made a cultural contribution through their trade to this city and indeed to this country.  This is multi-culturalism.  This artwork is the evidence and we must save this artefact, conserve and protect it for the joy and education of future generations. We cannot lose it or let it be taken away.
The Little Museum of Dublin would be an ideal place for this work to be represented and presented back to the Dublin people or any other similar place like it.  Indeed, I would go so far as to say that the North side of Dublin needs its own Little Museum of Dublin. We didn’t save Wood Quay in the past or the Quays.  Much of Dublin has been destroyed despite our cries – surely we can save this fine piece of Italian-Irish heritage? #loveculture
About the Mirolo family:
Guiseppe Mirolo came to Dublin in the 1930s, before the First World War he was studying medicine but that was all to change. He served his apprenticeship with artisans from his home region of Friuli in Northern Italy, he was also a ‘profigi’ or in modern terms a refugee. He worked hard to create a good life for his family and loved Dublin.
Some of his work survives in Dublin and in Christ the King Cathedral and the mosaic’s in Mullingar. The Harp on the steps of Walton’s Music Shop on North Frederick Street is his. The floor of the iconic Waldorf Barbershop is his floor.  The Mirolo family have been involved in Terrazzo & Mosaic for four generations now.
About the artist John ffrench:

John ffrench was born in Dublin to Irish and Italian parents. Travel and foreign inspiration has always been a factor in his work. His early art education was in design, drawing and calligraphy in the National College of Art in Dublin. In 1951, ffrench went to the Institute Statale d´Arte in Florence to study under professor Bruno Pauli. He stayed on in Italy until 1955 to work with like-minded ceramicists on one-off pieces and to soak up the innovations of Italian Modernism. The Mediterranean influence, so apparent in his work from then on, set him apart on his return to Ireland. At this time, Ireland had virtually no craft pottery tradition and mass produced and imported work was standard. Even in the 1950´s, the new craft schools based on the Bernard Leach school favoured the Anglo-Oriental style of dun-coloured pots, the “little brown pots” as they were known.

When ffrench returned to Ireland in 1956 he set up the ‘Ring Studio´ in Kilkenny with Peter Brennan. He began to create pots unlike any seen previously in the country; ffrench preferred to hand build rather than throw his pots and they were very sculptural and experimental in form. The cubist paintings of Picasso and Braque inspired both the ceramics and paintings he made at this time and much of his work was large and irregularly shaped (to the point that his work was described as “too obstinately asymmetrical” by a Dublin newspaper).

In 1962, ffrench returned to Ireland and founded the Arklow Studio Pottery. The Scandinavian Report into the status and quality of craft in Ireland had been scathing, a government initiative to improve standards by involving experts in the various fields was set up. Ffrench was closely involved in this capacity with Kilkenny Studios, which was producing designers for various industries. Influences from his time spent in India were seen in the imagery, colour, form and pattern work of his time. The studio produced tableware, pots, jewellery, wall panels in colourfully glazed, stamped and gilded finishes. In 1969, he moved to America and opened the Dolphin Studio in Massachusetts. With his wife he added batik works and silk-screen prints to his range. He made cheerfully coloured decorative temples and mythical buildings made from individual tiles and arranged like children´s building blocks. In 2007, John ffrench was honoured with a lifetime achievement show from the Arts Council of Ireland.

The Cutlers, Thomas Reads, in miniature by Tom Hudson

The Cutlers, Thomas Reads, Parliament Street Dublin

The Cutlers, Thomas Reads, Parliament Street Dublin – Miniature model by Tom Hudson

Reads LH window

The genius of the visual literature of miniature. After years of vigilance regarding the protection and preservation of Thomas Reads, The Cutlers in Parliament Street, a building loved by Dubliners and the world over, of all the things to fall into my lap and hands, these photos of Tom Hudson’s miniature models of Thomas Reads in around the early 1970tys are certainly the most wondrous and precious.

Fantastic to have confirmed that actual models in these photos are still in existence in the hands of a collector (Charles Dudley) of Tom Hudson’s works.

 

Here is vanished history in great detail rendered back for today’s society.  How important are these works is anyone’s guess.  But the fact that they are here I’m sure is going to be to everybody’s delight.  Take a closer look and enter the window of Thomas Reads for a true bit of window shopping into the past. Notice the matchbox and its size and then you get a sense of scale of the detail. James Joyce would be proud.  As they say, you can rebuild Dublin from Ulysses but here is certainly one of its oldest shops, actualized in miniature in extraordinary detail.  As alive now as ever it was.

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Reads Right Hand Window in miniature

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Doors of Thomas Reads, in miniature