Historic Monument- 21 Aungier Street

Aungier Street 21 After

21 Aungier Street, Dublin.  

No 21 Aungier Street is designated under 4 different legal principles; National Monuments and Sites Act, Article 38 protecting all original materials and use, Section 19 Revenue Act amortising costs against tax and access to the public, 2000 planning and Development act on the list of the RPS (Record of Protected Structure)

  • 1992 the building was recognised by Dublin Civic Trust as a late 17th century building.  It was reported to the relevant department and was given status – protective status under the monument and sites act and registered as a National Monument.
  • 1995 The Bord Pleanala reversed the demolition order on it.  Because of its status, an appeal was made to the word and the Bord reversed the decision by DCC and the building was vested in the ownership of the Dublin Civic Trust.
  • 1995-97 Research to prove historic and material significance – the dating of timber frame walls which are very early.  The timber dating of the early staircase to 1680. This is the only full staircase of its kind going up 4 floors with 6 turns in it – it has early pear shaped balustrades the same as the ones in the Royal Hospital.

Number 21 Aungier Street is a substantial late 17th-century mansion one of the oldest recorded buildings in the city, a structure of outstanding architectural and historical significance, built during the 1660s on lands leased by Sir Francis Aungier to Robert Reading, Esq., an influential colleague of the Duke of Ormond, and was subsequently home to the Earls of Rosse, supporters of King James II at the Battle of the Boyne.

The building is a rare surviving example in Dublin of the transition in building technology from late medieval timber framing to brick and masonry construction.

It substantially retains its original plan and layout, consisting of four rooms, arranged around a centrally positioned staircase and two massive chimney stacks, flanked by smaller closet rooms.

The internal walls are timber-framed and are similar in character to those found in Numbers 9- 9A Aungier Street, a 17th-century mansion that has more recently come to light, a building  recognised for its rarity by Dublin City Council, conservation department.

The staircase in No.21 survives intact, it rises six flights through the building, featuring squared newels, a wide heavy handrail and handsome pear-shaped balusters characteristic of the late 17th century and is the only means of accessing the upper floors.

AC34b

Original staircase before renovation

 

Renovation of the building

 

Aungier 21

21 Aungier Street in 1991

 

In 1992, planning permission was granted for demolition of the building, which was subsequently overturned by An Bord Pleanála in acknowledgement of the mansion’s outstanding architectural significance. Through Dublin Civic Trust’s intervention, (then) Dublin Corporation arranged for a site swap with the developer who had originally purchased it from the Corporation, and subsequently vested the property in Dublin Civic Trust in 1995.

The Dublin Civic Trust undertook a major year-long programme of structural stabilisation, conservation and restoration as a pioneering built heritage demonstration project, which was grant aided by Dublin Corporation and the Department of Environment.

This included extensive steel and masonry bracing, reinstating the roof, repointing the late Georgian façade of c.1810, salvaging and refurbishing all original joinery elements, lime plaster wall and ceiling repairs, and the careful reinstatement of windows to exact historic profiles. A stand-out element of the works was the meticulous consolidation and repair of the rare original staircase and timber-framed walls.

Upon completion of the essential conservation works, Dublin Civic Trust sold the property under our Revolving Fund Scheme to a private owner who undertook to complete the building and operate it as a 15-bedroom heritage guesthouse with associated café at ground floor level. The grant of permission for this use (Ref: 2678/96), which operated until approximately the year 2000, was conditioned on reasonable public access being afforded to the first-floor level, in addition to full public access at ground floor level. Under the same grant, a planning condition required an agreement to be signed under Section 38 of the Local Government (Planning and Development) Act 1963 (amended) stipulating the preservation of the original staircase, original timber beams and medieval timber partitions, original free standing chimney stacks, and the restored front and rear walls. A further condition requested that “no further subdivisions of the important ground and first floors shall be permitted.”

  • On completion of the restoration in 1997 the Dublin Civic Trust – the building was launched by the then minister Liz Mc Manus – a section 38 agreement was drawn up protecting all original material identified and stating that this would not be removed or interfered with in the foreseeable future – this was signed by Dublin Corporation.
  • Section 19 under the Revenue act was obtained on the building which entitled a would-be purchaser to amortise the restoration costs against their tax liability. This was subsequently used by the new owner.

Since approximately the year 2000 Number 21 was pressed into unauthorised use as a long-term hostel providing residential accommodation for the Immigration Service, and latterly to the Department of Justice as a step-down facility for young offenders. This use was in breach of the authorised guesthouse use which afforded public access to the property and facilitated the appreciation and enjoyment of its unique heritage features.

Irish Times, March 2nd 2017: Olivia O Kelly

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/historic-monument-in-dublin-to-be-used-for-the-homeless-1.2994185

Irish Times, March 26th 2017: Olivia O Kelly

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/conversion-of-historic-dublin-building-to-homeless-hostel-stopped-1.3020461

Repeal the patronage of the present Artane Band

Tonight before Dublin City Council meeting a motion will be tabled to discontinue the Lord Mayor of Dublin’s patronage of the Artane Band. This band form part of the institutional gulags that are directly connected to the Tuam mother and baby home, the Magdalene Laundry system, the Industrial and reform school system, the orphanages, Bethany Home and the many other sites and centres of injustice to children and women that are scattered around this country.

Please support our campaign to disband the Artane Band.

www.disbandtheartaneband.com

bons-secours

Bon Secours grounds Tuam

DUBLIN CITY COUNCIL

Emergency Motion on behalf of Independent Cllr. Mannix Flynn (IND)

That this meeting of Dublin City Council calls on the Lord Mayor of Dublin, Cllr Brendan Carr, to withdraw the patronage of the Lord Mayor’s Office from the Artane Band.
This patronage causes grave offense and insult to the many who suffered child sexual abuse in the Artane Industrial School, Artane Boys Band and other such Christian Brother Institutions.

It is important to note that the present Artane Band was founded in the Artane Industrial school and continues to wear the insignia and uniform of that industrial school.  Its origins are firmly rooted in the industrial school system and its legacy of crimes against children, further it is still connected to the Christian Brothers organization.

Reasons;.

The Lord Mayor, Cllr. Brendan Carr, has continued to ignore the many who are campaigning for justice with regards to what happened in their childhoods in the Artane Industrial school and indeed the Artane Boys Band, where many young children were sexually, emotionally and physically abused, their suffering continues to this day

For the Lord Mayor and chairman of Dublin City Council to continue to be the patron of the Artane Band is an outrage and will bring Dublin City Council’s reputation into disrepute by supporting the legacy of child abuse that took place in Artane Industrial School and the Artane Band. It is important that Dublin City Council and the office of the Lord Mayor distance themselves from this band and its history, which are well documented in the Ryan Report.

It is not the children who are in the band at present, but rather the band that the children are in, and its association with crimes against children. The institution of the Artane Industrial School and the Artane Band are directly connected to the likes of the Tuam Mother and Baby Homes, the Magdalene Laundry system, the Industrial and Reform School system, the Bethany Home and Orphanage system and form a central part of the architecture of containment that was so unjust.

Dublin City Council in this instance is facilitating further harm and suffering to the many victims of child rape and cruelty perpetrated on them while in the Artane Industrial School, home of the Artane Boys Band.

It is a fact that many of those who were abused and child raped by Christian Brothers were members of the Artane Boys Band, now known as the Artane Band.

Time to repeal the patronage of the present Artane Band in the interest of justice

Cllr. Mannix Flynn

Dublin Flea Christmas Market

Hop along to the Dublin Flea Christmas Market

Friday 9th December – Sunday 11th December 2016

The Local Enterprise Office Dublin City (LEO Dublin City) is proud to support Dublin’s best loved, free entry, Christmas Market, which comes to the Point Village (beside the 3Arena) from Friday 9th December to Sunday 11th December.

 

Greg Swift, Head of Enterprise and Economic Development, Dublin City Council, commented, “We are delighted to be supporting the Dublin Flea Christmas Market in the Point Village this year.  There will be over 100 stalls showcasing the work of independent designers, craft makers and artists.  By purchasing Irish-made gifts you will be supporting local jobs and buying unique gifts that are not available on the high street.”

He continued, “The market is free of charge, it’s a place to come with friends and family and spend some time browsing the stalls, enjoying the festive atmosphere and getting a bite to eat or drink.  The market is indoors so you will be cosy whatever the weather is like.”

Stalls will be spread over 2 floors of this ultra-modern repurposed shopping centre with 15,000 visitors expected to come along over the weekend.  The relaxed atmosphere offers lots of space for shoppers to take their time and enjoy the annual hunt of the perfect Christmas gift.

The Dublin Flea Market is a family friendly day out with lots to keep the children entertained including well know magician Hamish Urquhart working his magic on them.  There will be food for everyone with a great selection of hot pie stalls, falafel, sweet treats and seriously good coffee, all under a covered hangout area where buskers and carol singers will entertain satisfied shoppers.

Whether browsing for presents or decorations for the home, haggling for bargains, feasting on the food stall treats or simply meeting up with friends to soak up some Christmas atmosphere, it will be impossible not to feel the festive vibe at the Dublin Flea Christmas Market.

 

(Featured image by Bill Hastings)

Bike Stuff n’ Gadgets awards

Five Smart Projects Receive Funding to Improve Cycling in Dublin

Dublin City Council and Enterprise Ireland announced the winners of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) competition at The House of Lords, Bank of Ireland, College Green this evening.

The competition, which was launched by Smart Dublin last March, sought to find smart technology solutions to help improve and scale up cycling across Dublin. The challenge generated 98 expressions of interest, 23 proposals with 14 dragons den style pitches.

Five companies were selected to receive funding of up to €12,500 and supports from Dublin City Council to research and demonstrate the viability of their smart solution.

bicycle-keating

The chosen companies and their smart solutions are:

 

  • Ambie introducing BikeLook which monitors bicycle usage and deters and detects bicycle theft

 

  • Fluidedge introducing Liberty Bell, a bell that allows cyclists to record actual or perceived obstacles to aid safe cycling in Dublin

 

  • Hindnseek presents a low power device attached to a bicycle that generates real time data with can be integrated with other data sources

 

  • Limeforge Ltd. offers the See.Sense Tracker providing a ‘find your iphone’ like capability allowing cyclists to easily track their stolen bikes

 

  • M2C Smartcharge Ltd. introduces a tracking, logging and data harvesting system for use with bicycles in an urban area aiding the cyclist in predicting the ease of a journey, safety along the way and creating a secure parking facility and the end of the journey

 

Commenting at the announcement Dublin City Council’s Chief Executive, Owen Keegan said “A key aspect of our Smart Dublin initiative is to test new ways for the Dublin Local Authorities to pilot and understand the possibilities of using innovative technologies to solve city challenges.  We are genuinely impressed with the level of ideas that were presented through the SBIR process and look forward to working with these entrepreneurs to pilot and hopefully scale their products using Dublin as a test bed.”

Kevin Sherry, Divisional Manager, Enterprise Ireland commented “Enterprise Ireland is excited to work with Dublin City Council on this initiative, and we congratulate the phase one winners on their innovative solutions which will improve the cycling experience and safety of bicycle users in urban areas.”

David Timoney, Dublin Cycling Campaign who are supporting the initiative added “There are real opportunities to use these new low cost innovations to better understand cycling patterns and experiences.  This in turn will allow for more evidence based decisions by the City on cycling infrastructure. The data will hopefully strengthen the already strong arguments for increased transport spends on cycling.  Furthermore solutions to address cycle theft in Dublin through smart tracker devices have the potential to dramatically reduce bike theft levels currently estimated at a staggering €20,000 per annum in Dublin alone.”

The companies have three months to develop their solution to pre-prototype stage, after which some will be selected for further funding (up to €25,000 each) to complete their prototype solutions.

ENDS

 For further information contact:

Jamie Cudden, Smart City Programme Manager, Dublin City Council M 087 783 5411

Notes to the Editor:

Details of the successful proposals are:

Ambie: BikeLook is a smart city solution to monitor bicycle usage and to deter and detect bicycle theft. Using low power radio (Bluetooth Smart) to track bicycles in the city. Bluetooth trackers’ effectiveness is usually limited by the radio range between the sensor and a mobile phone, but through strategic location of listening posts at bicycle parking, junctions and on street sweepers, the opportunity exists to monitor the volume and direction of cycle traffic in the city.

 

Fluidedge: ‘Liberty Bell’ – A smart bicycle bell that allow citizens who cycle record actual or perceived obstacles to safe cycling in Dublin. Hotspots are highlighted in real-time and authorities are alerted to poor road conditions or poor behaviour by other road users.

 

Hidnseek: A low power device attached to a bicycle that has the ability to generate real time data which can be integrated with existing data sources and information to create an overall accurate picture of the cycling experience in Dublin. The device can measure GPS co-ordinates, speed and environmental conditions using the low cost sigfox network.

 

Limeforge Ltd – See.Sense: The See.Sense Tracker will provide a ‘find your iphone’ like capability using LPWA and GPS, allowing cyclists to easily track their stolen bike anywhere across the city. At the same time, our patent-pending use of sensor technology enables the crowd sourcing of real-time data about cyclist’s journeys over a wide range of variables. Two variants will be created – one for use on personal bikes and one for integration into city bikes alongside our ICON intelligent bike light.

 

M2C Smartcharge Ltd: A tracking, logging and data harvesting system for use with bicycles in a metropolitan area. The system will endeavour to aid the cyclist in predicting the ease of a journey (front end), safety along the way with geographic analysis (Journey Safety) and create a secure parking facility at the end of the journey (destination management)

_________________________________

 

Smart Dublin is an initiative of the four Dublin Local Authorities to engage with smart technology providers, researchers and citizens to solve city challenges and improve city life.

 

Enterprise Ireland is the government organisation responsible for the development and growth of Irish enterprises in world markets. It supports sustainable economic growth, regional development and secure employment.

 

Dublin Cycling Campaign The Dublin Cycling Campaign is an independent, voluntary cycling advocacy group that has been working to improve the city for all cyclists since 1993 www.dublincycling.ie

 

What is Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)? SBIR refers to the public procurement of research and development on new innovative solutions before they are commercially available. It involves different suppliers competing through different phases of development, while the risks and benefits are shared between the procurers and the suppliers under market conditions.

Conflict + the City – Free talks

Some of you might be interested in this two day conference at Liberty Hall. The event is free but you must register through the email at the bottom of this press release.  It is a public event and open to all.

31st May-June 1st 

List of speakers can be found here: http://conflictandthecity.ie/speakers/

 

CONFLICT + THE CITY – Public Conference in Liberty Hall Theatre  (FREE)

City Wall CHAPTER 5-700x572Dublin City Council’s Heritage Office, in conjunction with UCD Decade of Centenaries, is organising a two-day Public Conference entitled‘Conflict + The City’ in Liberty Hall Theatre. The Conference is aimed at the general public and admission is free.

Over the two days speakers will engage with the audience in discussing the effect of war on the streets and buildings of cities, the rebuilding that then happens and how this affects the way we experience our cities today. Day one will mostly concentrate on Dublin post-rebellion (and post-1922) and then broaden out to look at major cities across Europe with international speakers focusing on Beirut and Berlin. Day two will look at Jerusalem, Belfast, Sarajevo, and the contemporary situation in Calais, for examples.

Speaking about the conference, Charles Duggan, Heritage Officer with Dublin City Council said “This conference is designed for the general public, for anyone who has an interest in Dublin and how the city was rebuilt after the conflicts that took place from 1916 to 1922. But as well as that, we will be placing Dublin in a greater European context and looking at the effect of conflicts on other great European cities. A host of International speakers, together with local experts will deliver talks on an aspect of the city that has yet to be explored.”

Dr. Ellen Rowley of UCD said “Staying in the twentieth century, this two-day public conference will present research into various architectures of war and cities in repair, from Beirut to Blitz-time London; from Cold War bunkers to Belfast’s peace-lines. Today, in Dublin, much of how we move through, spend time in and experience the city comes out of the 1920s reconstruction projects. The scars of conflict and the efforts towards rebuilding resonate through Dublin’s architecture, almost 100 years later.”

ENDS

The conference is free but booking is essential.

For more information see W: www.conflictandthecity.ie

E: heritage@dublincity.ie T: (01) 222 3090

 

Women of 1916- Áine Ceannt

The images on this site are from our installation ‘Something to Live for’ situated over the Ivy on Parliament Street and Dame Street Dublin.  The work was first installed in 2006 and has been reinstated for 2016.

Aine Ceannt

Áine Ceannt (née Brennan) – Something to Live For

 

Áine Ceannt (née Brennan)  1880-1954

Frances O’Brennan is best known by her married name, Áine Ceannt, as the widow of Eamonn Ceannt, one of the leaders of the 1916 Rising.

Frances was born on 23 September 1880, four months after the death of her father, Frank O’Brennan. Elizabeth Butler, Fanny’s mother got a job as a nurse in a workhouse after her husband’s death.

At the turn of the century Fanny joined the Gaelic League and, like many of the other women who became interested in the Irish language, she adopted an Irish name, Áine.  It was in the Gaelic League that she met Eamonn Ceannt. Their first encounter was on an annual excursion to Galway in 1901.  The couple married on 7th June 1905.  Their son Rónán was born on 18th  June 1906. Eamonn worked in the Dublin Corporation.  By 1916, he was the assistant to the City Treasurer and commanded a substantial salary.  He was a committed nationalist; in 1913, he joined the Irish Volunteers as a Private and rose to the rank of Captain.  He was in charge of the South Dublin Union garrison in 1916.

Just before his execution on 8th May 1916, Eamonn Ceannt wrote a last letter to his wife: ‘My dearest wife Áine. Not wife but widow before these lines reach you….Dearest ‘silly little Fanny’ My poor little sweetheart of – how many – years ago…Ever my comforter, God comfort you now.  What can I say? I die a noble death, for Ireland’s freedom…You will be – you are, the wife of one of the Leaders of the Revolution.  Sweeter still you are my little child, my dearest pet, my sweetheart of the hawthorn hedges and Summer’s ever….’

Like many of the other widows, Áine moved into a public role following the Rising. She had been a member of Cumann na mBan from its inception and her sister Lily, was in the Marrowbone Lane garrison. Áine served as vice-president of Cumann na mBan from 1917-1925.  In 1918 she contested the elections for the Urban District Council of Rathmines and was vice-chairman for a period.  During the years 1920-21, she acted as a District Justice in the republican courts in the Dublin suburbs of Rathmines and Rathgar. During the War of Independance, she sheltered men on the run; one of the many who stayed with her was Robert Barton.  She also acted as an arbitrator for the Labour Department of Dáil Éireann in wage disputes throughout the country.

In 1920, she became the founding member of the Irish White Cross allocating funds for the benefit of orphans of wars in Ireland.  By 1941 the office had closed but Áine archived all the papers and wrote a history of the White Cross from 1920-1947. 

From 1939-1947 she was a member of the Red Cross.  Mine died in February 1954. Her funeral took place in her local parish in Dundrum, County Dublin and she was buried in Deansgrange cemetery.

From the installation ‘Something to Live for’ Parliament St/Dame St Dublin by Farcry Productions Ltd.

http://www.1916onehundred.ie

32nd Dáil Éireann…so far

ThomasReadPoster.qxd

‘Something to Live for’ – Installation at The Ivy/Oak -Parliament Street 2016

Here’s wishing all those elected to represent the people of Ireland the very best. Reconnect the people to the Dáil the Dáil to it’s people.

FIANNA FÁIL

Bobby Aylward (Carlow-Kilkenny)

John McGuinness (Carlow-Kilkenny)

Brendan Smith (Cavan Monaghan)

Niamh Smyth (Cavan Monaghan)

Timmy Dooley (Clare)

Kevin O’Keefe (Cork East)

Billy Kelleher (Cork North Central)

Aindrias Moynihan (Cork North West)

Michael Moynihan (Cork North West)

Michael McGrath (Cork South Central)

Micheál Martin (Cork South Central)

Margaret Murphy O’Mahony (Cork South West)

Charlie McConalogue (Donegal)

Pat ‘The Cope’ Gallagher (Donegal)

Sean Haughey (Dublin Bay North)

Jim O’Callaghan (Dublin Bay South)

Darragh O’Brien (Dublin Fingal)

John Curran (Dublin Mid West)

John Lahart (Dublin South West)

Jack Chambers (Dublin West)

Anne Rabbitte (Galway East)

Éamon Ó Cuív (Galway West)

John Brassil (Kerry)

Frank O’Rourke (Kildare North)

James Lawless (Kildare North)

Fiona O’Loughlin (Kildare South)

Seán O’Feargháil (Kildare South)

Sean Fleming (Laois)

Willie O’Dea (Limerick City)

Niall Collins (Limerick County)

Robert Troy (Longford Westmeath)

Declan Breathnach (Louth)

Dara Calleary (Mayo)

Lisa Chambers (Mayo)

Thomas Byrne (Meath East)

Shane Cassells (Meath West)

Barry Cowen (Offaly)

Eugene Murphy (Roscommon Galway)

Marc MacSharry (Sligo Leitrim)

Jackie Cahill (Tipperary)

Mary Butler (Waterford)

James Browne (Wexford)

Pat Casey (Wicklow)

Eamon Scanlon (Sligo-Leitrim)

FINE GAEL

John Paul Phelan (Carlow-Kilkenny)

Pat Deering (Carlow-Kilkenny)

Heather Humphreys (Cavan-Monaghan)

Pat Breen (Clare)

Joe Carey (Clare)

David Stanton (Cork East)

Dara Murphy (Cork North Central)

Michael Creed (Cork North West)

Simon Coveney (Cork South Central)

Jim Daly (Cork South West)

Joe McHugh (Donegal)

Richard Bruton (Dublin Bay North)

Eoghan Murphy (Dublin Bay South)

Kate O’Connell (Dublin Bay South)

Paschal Donohoe (Dublin Central)

Alan Farrell (Dublin Fingal)

Frances Fitzgerald (Dublin Mid West)

Noel Rock (Dublin North-West)

Josepha Madigan (Dublin Rathdown)

Catherine Byrne (Dublin South Central)

Colm Brophy (Dublin South West)

Leo Varadkar (Dublin West)

Maria Bailey (Dun Laoghaire)

Sean Barrett (Dun Laoghaire) – automatically re-elected

Mary Mitchell O’Connor (Dun Laoghaire)

Ciaran Cannon (Galway East)

Sean Kyne (Galway West)

Hildegarde Naughton (Galway West)

Brendan Griffin (Kerry)

Bernard Durkan (Kildare North)

Martin Heydon (Kildare South)

Charlie Flanagan (Laois)

Michael Noonan (Limerick City)

Patrick O’Donovan (Limerick County)

Tom Neville (Limerick County)

Peter Fitzpatrick (Louth)

Fergus O’Dowd (Louth)

Enda Kenny (Mayo)

Michael Ring (Mayo)

Helen McEntee (Meath East)

Regina Doherty (Meath East)

Damien English (Meath West)

Marcella Corcoran Kennedy (Offaly)

Tony McLoughlin (Sligo-Leitrim)

John Deasy (Waterford)

Micheal D’Arcy (Wexford)

Paul Kehoe (Wexford)

Andrew Doyle (Wicklow)

Simon Harris (Wicklow)

Eamon Ryan  (Dublin Bay South)

Catherine Martin (Dublin Rathdown)

INDEPENDENT ALLIANCE

Finian McGrath (Dublin Bay North)

Shane Ross (Dublin Rathdown)

Sean Canney (Galway East)

Kevin “Boxer ” Moran (Longford Westmeath)

Michael Fitzmaurice (Roscommon Galway)

John Halligan (Waterford)

INDEPENDENTS/OTHERS

Michael Harty (Clare)

Michael Collins (Cork South West)

Thomas Pringle (Donegal)

Tommy Broughan (Dublin Bay North)

Maureen O’Sullivan (Dublin Central)

Clare Daly (Dublin Fingal)

Joan Collins (Dublin South Central)

Katherine Zappone (Dublin South West)

Catherine Connolly (Galway West)

Noel Grealish (Galway West)

Danny Healy-Rae (Kerry)

Michael Healy-Rae (Kerry)

Denis Naughten (Roscommon-Galway)

Michael Lowry (Tipperary)

Mattie McGrath (Tipperary)

Seamus Healy (Tipperary)

Mick Wallace (Wexford)

LABOUR

Sean Sherlock (Cork East)

Brendan Ryan (Dublin Fingal)

Joan Burton (Dublin West)

Jan O’Sullivan (Limerick City)

Alan Kelly (Tipperary)

Brendan Howlin (Wexford)

PBP/AAA

Mick Barry (Cork North Central)

Gino Kenny (Dublin Mid West)

Paul Murphy (Dublin South West)

Ruth Coppinger (Dublin West)

Richard Boyd Barrett (Dun Laoghaire)

Bríd Smith (Dublin South Central)

SINN FÉIN

Kathleen Funchion (Carlow Kilkenny)

Caoimhghin Ó Caoláin (Cavan Monaghan)

Pat Buckley (Cork East)

Jonathan O’Brien (Cork North Central)

Donnchadh O’Laoghaire (Cork South Central)

Pearse Doherty (Donegal)

Mary Lou McDonald (Dublin Central)

Denise Mitchell (Dublin Bay North)

Louise O’Reilly (Dublin Fingal)

Eoin O’Broin (Dublin Mid West)

Dessie Ellis (Dublin North West)

Aengus Ó’Snodaigh (Dublin South Central)

Sean Crowe (Dublin South West)

Martin Ferris (Kerry)

Brian Stanley (Laois)

Maurice Quinlivan (Limerick City)

Gerry Adams (Louth)

Imelda Munster (Louth)

Peadar Tóibín (Meath West)

Carol Nolan (Offaly)

Martin Kenny (Sligo Leitrim)

David Cullinane (Waterford)

John Brady (Wicklow)

SOCIAL DEMOCRATS

Roisín Shortall (Dublin North West)

Catherine Murphy (Kildare North)

Stephen Donnelly (Wicklow)