Kamerino: Catalan shop comes to Dublin

KAMERINO POP-UP SHOP. Barcelona

Exclusive five-day sale of a unique collection of handmade pieces from the old workshop of a historic Barcelona shop specializing in party favours and theatrical curios.

You’ll find cardboard masks, hats and instruments, genuine Japanese lanterns, paper toys and a dazzling array of other weird and wonderful objects made between 1926 and 1948.

From Wednesday 1st March 2017 until Sunday 5th March 2017

Open: 10am-6pm daily

Adifferentkettleoffishaltogether, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

The Catalan artist/performer/scenographer/collector and antique furniture restorer Xavier Palet Sabater will set up his exquisite shop at 18 Ormond Quay Dublin 7.  Now the new home of Dublin Civic Trust.  This will be the final event to take place in this historic building before the Trust begin renovations and the scaffolding goes up.

Please call in and visit over the week.  Xavier is selling rare Catalan stock from 1926-1948 and will be giving a demonstration and talk on Saturday 4th March at 3 pm in 18 Ormond.  (Adifferentkettleoffishaltogether)

This is a free event but limited seating – 20 persons

Please email farcryproductionsltd@gmail.com to book a place

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Kamerino shop, Barcelona

 

 

POP-UP SHOP KAMERINO. Barcelona

Exclusiva venta durante seis días de la inédita colección recuperada de un antiguo almacén de Barcelona dedicado a la fabricación artesanal de artículos de teatro y fiesta entre los años 1926 y 1948.

Podréis encontrar máscaras, sombreros e instrumentos de cartón, auténticos faroles japoneses, juguetes de papel y una infinidad de objetos curiosos…

Además, programaremos una charla teatralizada para dar a conocer el proyecto.

Estaremos en a different kettle of fish altogether, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublín, del 28 de febrero al 5 de marzo de 2017.

Horario: 10 h a 18 h

Encontraréis más información en la página de Facebook Kamerino Collection in Dublin.

 

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Please join us for Xavier’s workshop on Saturday 4th March at 3pm in 18 Ormond Quay Upper (adifferentkettleoffishaltogether)

 

xavier.jpg  Xavier Palet Sabater was born in a small town in L’Empordà, Catalonia. In 2000 he embarked on an artistic career restoring antique furniture and artwork while managing his workshop and the Kamerino shop in Calonge. Since 2007 he has also worked in the field of performance art and theatre, designing, directing and performing his own work at a number of festivals. In 2016 he launched the Kamerino de l’Enginy project in Barcelona.

 

timTim James Morris grew up on the south coast of England to a family with Welsh roots, but has lived for the last 15 years in Barcelona, where he translates for art exhibitions, festivals and other cultural events.

(Tim will be translating Xavier’s talk on Saturday 4th March)

Further information on the Kamerino Collection in Dublin Facebook page.

Supported by: Dublin Civic Trust/Farcry Productions/The Temple Bar Company/DCCFarcryLogos.indd

Irish Music to watch for on Raelach Records

MUSIC is a universal language, appealing to the very soul of man, and is the outpouring of the heart, whether to express joy or sorrow, to rouse to battle or soothe to sleep, to give expression or jubilation for the living or of wailing for the dead, to manifest sympathy with society or devotion to the Deity. It is, as Thomas Davis writes, “the first faculty of the Irish.
(From A History of Irish Music by William H. Grattan Flood)
Over the past few months, Raelach records have released some of the finest recordings of Irish musicians that I have heard for many years.  On Sunday at City Hall Dublin,  we had the honorary concert for the wonderful Tony MacMahon which coincided with the release of a new album of slow airs. (Farewell to Music – Tony MacMahon)
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Photography and artwork by Maurice Gunning

This Thursday 24th at The Cobblestone, Dublin 1, Raelach Records will be releasing a new album by Jack Talty  called ‘In Flow’.
I have been listening to it all day today and it’s a fantastic collection of tunes, jigs, reels, hornpipes and slow airs.
Guests on the night will include John Blake, Ruairí McGorman, Áine Bird, Aidan Connolly, and Saileog Ní Cheannabháín.
We need to support our musicians, buy their CDs, go see them live and spread the word.  They carry with them in their music our songlines.
 LIST OF UPCOMING CONCERTS 
Saturday, 26 November
Saileog Ní Cheannabháin @
Hoban’s Bar, Westport, Co Mayo
8pm
~
Sunday, 27 November
Jack Talty @
O’Sullivan’s Courthouse Pub, Dingle
9pm
~
Saturday, 3 December
Saileog Ní Cheannabháin + Aidan Connolly @
Holmes’ of Doohoma, Co Mayo
Time to be announced 
~
Sunday, 4 December
Cuar (Neil Ó Loclainn, Aoife Ní Bhriain, Maitiú Ó Báiréil)
+
Danny Diamond @
63 Merrion Square, Dublin 2 (Royal Society of Antiquaries)
4.30pm
€15 incl. glass of wine. Pre-booking advised >
 
 LIST OF CDS AVAILABLE FROM RAELACH RECORDS

Tony Mac Mahon, Farewell to Music

https://raelachrecords.bandcamp.com/album/farewell-to-music

Jack Talty, In Flow 
Aidan Connolly, Be Off 
Saileog Ní Cheannabháin, Roithleán 
Ensemble Ériu, Imbas 

Festival of Feminism – Ennis ‘Silence+Voice’

Festival of Feminism
 ‘Silence+Voice’
 8th and 9th of October
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The Daly family from Limerick.  A family of women steeped in strength, true feminism, and republican tradition.  

  • Two days of key note speakers talking about Trauma, Silence and Voice
  • The speakers are Bríd Keenan, Belfast based expert on trauma
  • Siobhan Madden Social Researcher, Feminist Activist speaking about voice, silence, memory and knowledge
  •  Dr Micheline Sheehy Skeffington, speaking about her Grandparents and campaign for gender equality in third level institutions
  • Mary McDermott Radical Educator and Feminist Philosopher who will speak about the interaction betweeen social and personal change
  • These speakers and key themes are interwoven with music, poetry, drama song and dance, and most importantly conversation and tea….
  •  €25.00 per individual for the two days.. plus a light lunch, plus a creche, plus ISL interpreters and for those that cannot afford it we have a limited amount of free tickets….so it would be nice to entice those on the East Coast over to the West for two days.

  • https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/silence-voice-a-festival-of-feminisms-tickets-26309500424.

Talk by Fiachra MacGabhann- Dundalk

For those of you within driving distance of Dundalk town there will be a very interesting talk given by Fiachra Mac Gabhann this Friday June 10th on Irish Place Names.  It will be well worth attending. No booking needed.

 

kilflynn

Kilflynn, Co Kerry……

 

An Archive of Our Past: Placenames and Sense of Place

Speaker: Fiachra Mac Gabhann

Time: 8.00pm

Venue: Wellington Hall, St. Mary’s Road, Dundalk

Date: Friday, June 10th 2016

Organisers: Dundalk Culture Club

 

Toponymy – the study of Place Names – gives us a fascinating and unique access to our past. It connects us to the landscape and nature and is a well­spring of geographical, historical and mythical information.

Fiachra Mac Gabhann presents a talk that will draw on his extraordinary ten­ volume study of the Place Names of County Mayo, Logainmneacha Mhaigh Eo, to examine some of the intricacies of these themes and piece together some of what has been lost, and offer perspectives on the historical and cultural significance of Irish placenames to our sense of identity.

Admission is Free but donations are welcome. 

This event has been organised by the Dundalk Culture Club.

Johnny Murphy Forever

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I am obliged to you. Ah, pardon, it’s I am obliged to you. Its we who are obliged to each other. 

 

Johnny Murphy was an extraordinary talented Dublin artist. He once told me he discovered his talent for performing in the Don Bosco in Crumlin, but I remember seeing Johnny in the many many great productions that the late Deirdre O Connell did at the Focus Theatre. They were the great European classics, Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov. Huge talent on a tiny stage, in a tiny place, bursting at the seams. The passion, the commitment, the drive, the humanity that emanated from Johnny Murphy’s performance was something that I carry to this day. Those days, that stage, that place were shared with other greats, Gabriel Byrne, Ena May, Tom Hickey. These people created a whole new energy which was later harnessed into the Project Arts Centre under the baton of the Sheridan brothers, Jim and Peter who assembled a dynamic bunch of individuals that, in my view, changed the course of Irish acting, Irish performance, Irish playwriting, Irish stage writing and dramatic energy.

Johnny Murphy was a vital part, an essential ingredient, a navigator in all of that.

From Yeats’ work to Beckett’s work to Jim and Peter’s own works, the whole collaboration of the Project Arts Centre all boiled down to one ingredient – the performance of the artist and actors. Johnny Murphy was a star attraction. Not just on that stage, but in people’s lives. He was a very generous, no bullshit person who could cut to the chase. I had some fantastic times with Johnny during my time at the Project and in the many plays and tours that we all did as a company.

I deeply respected and appreciated his guidance, his consideration, his understanding and his generous love and what a funny guy. He was blessed with a marvelous wit and a comic genius. He could hold a stage and an audience anywhere. He could mesmerize with a look.

Nobody, that I know of, has ever forgotten a Johnny Murphy performance. Throughout the last number of years of his life he was as active as you possibly could be, particularly after giving what I believe was one of the most definitive performances in the history of Waiting for Godot, when he played the tragic, fabulous Estragon alongside Barry Mc Govern’s Vladimir at the Gate Theatre.  It was way back in the Project Arts Centre’s production of Waiting for Godot that Johnny first unleashed that performance and interpretation of Estragon to packed houses.

Drimnagh and Dublin are proud of Johnny Murphy.  An artist, a father, a brother and a son. Many of us who also loved Johnny, and I mean loved Johnny Murphy, will grieve and miss him. But we will always be reminded of Johnny as we pass his many haunts, his many theatres, and when his many friends gather in different groups, both now and into the future, to talk and remember.   It was Samuel Beckett who coined the phrase ‘we are born astride the grave, the light gleams for an instant, and then it is night once more’.  John Murphy’s light gleamed brightly in our hearts and in the limelight of the stage forever.  We are obliged to you Mr Murphy.

My deep condolences to his daughter, his family, his many friends and his many audiences.

Johnny, your cue. You’re on.”

 

Busking bylaws. The facts.

                          Street performance and Dublin City Council bylaws

There is a group of individuals who claim they represent all buskers who have been putting out  misinformation, not just about Dublin City Council, but about me in an unjust and inaccurate attempt to demonise and label me as anti-busking and anti-culture. This is not true.

Firstly, nobody, is attempting or has suggested banning busking or street performance.  At present, there is a document in the public domain seeking observations and suggestions with regards how we manage the public domain in relation to street performance. This is part of the democratic process of enshrining the rights of street performers while on the other hand maintaining a balance in the public domain which is also the workplace and home for thousands of people.

Over the years many residents and workers have complained to Dublin City Council and public representatives about the unbearable noise levels at certain locations in the city – mainly Grafton Street, Temple Bar, Henry Street and the GPO.

Having tried a voluntary code of conduct with regards performers’ noise levels, the City Council  decided it was appropriate to create a series of bylaws to help to manage the public domain more effectively.  These bylaws were enacted into law a year ago with a review period that would fix any blaring omissions or further complaints. 

The concerns at present mainly relate to amplification and noise levels and a general wish by many residents and workers to ban amplification which, as well as being a nuisance, drowns out acoustic buskers.  I am not against busking, but, like the residents and workers in the city centre, I  support this ban on amplification. 

This whole process has been democratic, open and transparent where everyone gets heard – unlike on Grafton Street or Temple Bar sometimes when you can only hear the noise that is so loud your head hurts. Anybody interested can read a copy of the new bylaws under consideration before they are voted upon and the voting process itself can be viewed by all when they are discussed at length in Dublin City Council at the Arts Strategic Policy Committee which is webcast live and available online to view after the meeting also.

Rest assured that Street performance and busking will always be a feature on Dublin and Irish streets and Irish culture is the richer for it.

I hope this clarifies some of the issues, even if it doesn’t stop the devious few who want to undermine me and who last year smashed the window of my former studio on Ormond Quay and graffitied disgusting comments all over the building.

Long live busking. Long live street performance. Long live a safe and healthy work place for all.

Unique Dublin Artefact – John ffrench/Mirolo Mosaic

 

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Mosaic in Boyers Restaurant, Dublin by John ffrench Irish Artist installed by Joe and David Mirolo – (The work is signed 1967)

Boyers of Earl Street is closing its doors for good.  Generations passed through these doors and the place is a wash with memory.  It is important to keep that connection to that memory, to that heritage, to that witness.
In the restaurant of Boyers is a mosaic artwork that many Dubliners over the generations enjoyed.  Too much of this unique work has been previously lost to skips and landfill.  Too many of our unique buildings, streets, have been simply bulldozed and replaced by ugly shopping centres or even uglier office blocks.  A thing of beauty is a joy forever.  This work was installed by Joe and David Mirolo an Italian-Irish family who made a cultural contribution through their trade to this city and indeed to this country.  This is multi-culturalism.  This artwork is the evidence and we must save this artefact, conserve and protect it for the joy and education of future generations. We cannot lose it or let it be taken away.
The Little Museum of Dublin would be an ideal place for this work to be represented and presented back to the Dublin people or any other similar place like it.  Indeed, I would go so far as to say that the North side of Dublin needs its own Little Museum of Dublin. We didn’t save Wood Quay in the past or the Quays.  Much of Dublin has been destroyed despite our cries – surely we can save this fine piece of Italian-Irish heritage? #loveculture
About the Mirolo family:
Guiseppe Mirolo came to Dublin in the 1930s, before the First World War he was studying medicine but that was all to change. He served his apprenticeship with artisans from his home region of Friuli in Northern Italy, he was also a ‘profigi’ or in modern terms a refugee. He worked hard to create a good life for his family and loved Dublin.
Some of his work survives in Dublin and in Christ the King Cathedral and the mosaic’s in Mullingar. The Harp on the steps of Walton’s Music Shop on North Frederick Street is his. The floor of the iconic Waldorf Barbershop is his floor.  The Mirolo family have been involved in Terrazzo & Mosaic for four generations now.
About the artist John ffrench:

John ffrench was born in Dublin to Irish and Italian parents. Travel and foreign inspiration has always been a factor in his work. His early art education was in design, drawing and calligraphy in the National College of Art in Dublin. In 1951, ffrench went to the Institute Statale d´Arte in Florence to study under professor Bruno Pauli. He stayed on in Italy until 1955 to work with like-minded ceramicists on one-off pieces and to soak up the innovations of Italian Modernism. The Mediterranean influence, so apparent in his work from then on, set him apart on his return to Ireland. At this time, Ireland had virtually no craft pottery tradition and mass produced and imported work was standard. Even in the 1950´s, the new craft schools based on the Bernard Leach school favoured the Anglo-Oriental style of dun-coloured pots, the “little brown pots” as they were known.

When ffrench returned to Ireland in 1956 he set up the ‘Ring Studio´ in Kilkenny with Peter Brennan. He began to create pots unlike any seen previously in the country; ffrench preferred to hand build rather than throw his pots and they were very sculptural and experimental in form. The cubist paintings of Picasso and Braque inspired both the ceramics and paintings he made at this time and much of his work was large and irregularly shaped (to the point that his work was described as “too obstinately asymmetrical” by a Dublin newspaper).

In 1962, ffrench returned to Ireland and founded the Arklow Studio Pottery. The Scandinavian Report into the status and quality of craft in Ireland had been scathing, a government initiative to improve standards by involving experts in the various fields was set up. Ffrench was closely involved in this capacity with Kilkenny Studios, which was producing designers for various industries. Influences from his time spent in India were seen in the imagery, colour, form and pattern work of his time. The studio produced tableware, pots, jewellery, wall panels in colourfully glazed, stamped and gilded finishes. In 1969, he moved to America and opened the Dolphin Studio in Massachusetts. With his wife he added batik works and silk-screen prints to his range. He made cheerfully coloured decorative temples and mythical buildings made from individual tiles and arranged like children´s building blocks. In 2007, John ffrench was honoured with a lifetime achievement show from the Arts Council of Ireland.