Rare Appearance by unique artist

Thursday night is the ace night of the week. It brings out the rare breeds, the unique folk to celebrate extraordinary achievements and gather in each other’s honor. This Thursday night (13th April)  is no exception.
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The unique, extraordinary Irish artist Tony MacMahon will be at the Cobblestone in Smithfield to launch yet another great work of art coming from the mind and soul of Cormac Begley.
So get down there and get closer to the great Irish music that is being made, played and produced today.
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Cormac Begley, album launch Thursday 13th @Cobblestone, Smithfield, Dublin

And of course, say hello to the master MacMahon. We owe him a great debt of gratitude and enormous respect for holding steadfast against the barbarians in this country who are hellbent on destroying our ancient culture, the Irish music. Tony Abú.
Cormac Begley Raelach Records
 

Historic Monument- 21 Aungier Street

Aungier Street 21 After

21 Aungier Street, Dublin.  

No 21 Aungier Street is designated under 4 different legal principles; National Monuments and Sites Act, Article 38 protecting all original materials and use, Section 19 Revenue Act amortising costs against tax and access to the public, 2000 planning and Development act on the list of the RPS (Record of Protected Structure)

  • 1992 the building was recognised by Dublin Civic Trust as a late 17th century building.  It was reported to the relevant department and was given status – protective status under the monument and sites act and registered as a National Monument.
  • 1995 The Bord Pleanala reversed the demolition order on it.  Because of its status, an appeal was made to the word and the Bord reversed the decision by DCC and the building was vested in the ownership of the Dublin Civic Trust.
  • 1995-97 Research to prove historic and material significance – the dating of timber frame walls which are very early.  The timber dating of the early staircase to 1680. This is the only full staircase of its kind going up 4 floors with 6 turns in it – it has early pear shaped balustrades the same as the ones in the Royal Hospital.

Number 21 Aungier Street is a substantial late 17th-century mansion one of the oldest recorded buildings in the city, a structure of outstanding architectural and historical significance, built during the 1660s on lands leased by Sir Francis Aungier to Robert Reading, Esq., an influential colleague of the Duke of Ormond, and was subsequently home to the Earls of Rosse, supporters of King James II at the Battle of the Boyne.

The building is a rare surviving example in Dublin of the transition in building technology from late medieval timber framing to brick and masonry construction.

It substantially retains its original plan and layout, consisting of four rooms, arranged around a centrally positioned staircase and two massive chimney stacks, flanked by smaller closet rooms.

The internal walls are timber-framed and are similar in character to those found in Numbers 9- 9A Aungier Street, a 17th-century mansion that has more recently come to light, a building  recognised for its rarity by Dublin City Council, conservation department.

The staircase in No.21 survives intact, it rises six flights through the building, featuring squared newels, a wide heavy handrail and handsome pear-shaped balusters characteristic of the late 17th century and is the only means of accessing the upper floors.

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Original staircase before renovation

 

Renovation of the building

 

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21 Aungier Street in 1991

 

In 1992, planning permission was granted for demolition of the building, which was subsequently overturned by An Bord Pleanála in acknowledgement of the mansion’s outstanding architectural significance. Through Dublin Civic Trust’s intervention, (then) Dublin Corporation arranged for a site swap with the developer who had originally purchased it from the Corporation, and subsequently vested the property in Dublin Civic Trust in 1995.

The Dublin Civic Trust undertook a major year-long programme of structural stabilisation, conservation and restoration as a pioneering built heritage demonstration project, which was grant aided by Dublin Corporation and the Department of Environment.

This included extensive steel and masonry bracing, reinstating the roof, repointing the late Georgian façade of c.1810, salvaging and refurbishing all original joinery elements, lime plaster wall and ceiling repairs, and the careful reinstatement of windows to exact historic profiles. A stand-out element of the works was the meticulous consolidation and repair of the rare original staircase and timber-framed walls.

Upon completion of the essential conservation works, Dublin Civic Trust sold the property under our Revolving Fund Scheme to a private owner who undertook to complete the building and operate it as a 15-bedroom heritage guesthouse with associated café at ground floor level. The grant of permission for this use (Ref: 2678/96), which operated until approximately the year 2000, was conditioned on reasonable public access being afforded to the first-floor level, in addition to full public access at ground floor level. Under the same grant, a planning condition required an agreement to be signed under Section 38 of the Local Government (Planning and Development) Act 1963 (amended) stipulating the preservation of the original staircase, original timber beams and medieval timber partitions, original free standing chimney stacks, and the restored front and rear walls. A further condition requested that “no further subdivisions of the important ground and first floors shall be permitted.”

  • On completion of the restoration in 1997 the Dublin Civic Trust – the building was launched by the then minister Liz Mc Manus – a section 38 agreement was drawn up protecting all original material identified and stating that this would not be removed or interfered with in the foreseeable future – this was signed by Dublin Corporation.
  • Section 19 under the Revenue act was obtained on the building which entitled a would-be purchaser to amortise the restoration costs against their tax liability. This was subsequently used by the new owner.

Since approximately the year 2000 Number 21 was pressed into unauthorised use as a long-term hostel providing residential accommodation for the Immigration Service, and latterly to the Department of Justice as a step-down facility for young offenders. This use was in breach of the authorised guesthouse use which afforded public access to the property and facilitated the appreciation and enjoyment of its unique heritage features.

Irish Times, March 2nd 2017: Olivia O Kelly

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/historic-monument-in-dublin-to-be-used-for-the-homeless-1.2994185

Irish Times, March 26th 2017: Olivia O Kelly

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/conversion-of-historic-dublin-building-to-homeless-hostel-stopped-1.3020461

Kamerino: Catalan shop comes to Dublin

KAMERINO POP-UP SHOP. Barcelona

Exclusive five-day sale of a unique collection of handmade pieces from the old workshop of a historic Barcelona shop specializing in party favours and theatrical curios.

You’ll find cardboard masks, hats and instruments, genuine Japanese lanterns, paper toys and a dazzling array of other weird and wonderful objects made between 1926 and 1948.

From Wednesday 1st March 2017 until Sunday 5th March 2017

Open: 10am-6pm daily

Adifferentkettleoffishaltogether, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

The Catalan artist/performer/scenographer/collector and antique furniture restorer Xavier Palet Sabater will set up his exquisite shop at 18 Ormond Quay Dublin 7.  Now the new home of Dublin Civic Trust.  This will be the final event to take place in this historic building before the Trust begin renovations and the scaffolding goes up.

Please call in and visit over the week.  Xavier is selling rare Catalan stock from 1926-1948 and will be giving a demonstration and talk on Saturday 4th March at 3 pm in 18 Ormond.  (Adifferentkettleoffishaltogether)

This is a free event but limited seating – 20 persons

Please email farcryproductionsltd@gmail.com to book a place

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Kamerino shop, Barcelona

 

 

POP-UP SHOP KAMERINO. Barcelona

Exclusiva venta durante seis días de la inédita colección recuperada de un antiguo almacén de Barcelona dedicado a la fabricación artesanal de artículos de teatro y fiesta entre los años 1926 y 1948.

Podréis encontrar máscaras, sombreros e instrumentos de cartón, auténticos faroles japoneses, juguetes de papel y una infinidad de objetos curiosos…

Además, programaremos una charla teatralizada para dar a conocer el proyecto.

Estaremos en a different kettle of fish altogether, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublín, del 28 de febrero al 5 de marzo de 2017.

Horario: 10 h a 18 h

Encontraréis más información en la página de Facebook Kamerino Collection in Dublin.

 

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Please join us for Xavier’s workshop on Saturday 4th March at 3pm in 18 Ormond Quay Upper (adifferentkettleoffishaltogether)

 

xavier.jpg  Xavier Palet Sabater was born in a small town in L’Empordà, Catalonia. In 2000 he embarked on an artistic career restoring antique furniture and artwork while managing his workshop and the Kamerino shop in Calonge. Since 2007 he has also worked in the field of performance art and theatre, designing, directing and performing his own work at a number of festivals. In 2016 he launched the Kamerino de l’Enginy project in Barcelona.

 

timTim James Morris grew up on the south coast of England to a family with Welsh roots, but has lived for the last 15 years in Barcelona, where he translates for art exhibitions, festivals and other cultural events.

(Tim will be translating Xavier’s talk on Saturday 4th March)

Further information on the Kamerino Collection in Dublin Facebook page.

Supported by: Dublin Civic Trust/Farcry Productions/The Temple Bar Company/DCCFarcryLogos.indd

Irish Music to watch for on Raelach Records

MUSIC is a universal language, appealing to the very soul of man, and is the outpouring of the heart, whether to express joy or sorrow, to rouse to battle or soothe to sleep, to give expression or jubilation for the living or of wailing for the dead, to manifest sympathy with society or devotion to the Deity. It is, as Thomas Davis writes, “the first faculty of the Irish.
(From A History of Irish Music by William H. Grattan Flood)
Over the past few months, Raelach records have released some of the finest recordings of Irish musicians that I have heard for many years.  On Sunday at City Hall Dublin,  we had the honorary concert for the wonderful Tony MacMahon which coincided with the release of a new album of slow airs. (Farewell to Music – Tony MacMahon)
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Photography and artwork by Maurice Gunning

This Thursday 24th at The Cobblestone, Dublin 1, Raelach Records will be releasing a new album by Jack Talty  called ‘In Flow’.
I have been listening to it all day today and it’s a fantastic collection of tunes, jigs, reels, hornpipes and slow airs.
Guests on the night will include John Blake, Ruairí McGorman, Áine Bird, Aidan Connolly, and Saileog Ní Cheannabháín.
We need to support our musicians, buy their CDs, go see them live and spread the word.  They carry with them in their music our songlines.
 LIST OF UPCOMING CONCERTS 
Saturday, 26 November
Saileog Ní Cheannabháin @
Hoban’s Bar, Westport, Co Mayo
8pm
~
Sunday, 27 November
Jack Talty @
O’Sullivan’s Courthouse Pub, Dingle
9pm
~
Saturday, 3 December
Saileog Ní Cheannabháin + Aidan Connolly @
Holmes’ of Doohoma, Co Mayo
Time to be announced 
~
Sunday, 4 December
Cuar (Neil Ó Loclainn, Aoife Ní Bhriain, Maitiú Ó Báiréil)
+
Danny Diamond @
63 Merrion Square, Dublin 2 (Royal Society of Antiquaries)
4.30pm
€15 incl. glass of wine. Pre-booking advised >
 
 LIST OF CDS AVAILABLE FROM RAELACH RECORDS

Tony Mac Mahon, Farewell to Music

https://raelachrecords.bandcamp.com/album/farewell-to-music

Jack Talty, In Flow 
Aidan Connolly, Be Off 
Saileog Ní Cheannabháin, Roithleán 
Ensemble Ériu, Imbas 

Festival of Feminism – Ennis ‘Silence+Voice’

Festival of Feminism
 ‘Silence+Voice’
 8th and 9th of October
daly-family-photos

The Daly family from Limerick.  A family of women steeped in strength, true feminism, and republican tradition.  

  • Two days of key note speakers talking about Trauma, Silence and Voice
  • The speakers are Bríd Keenan, Belfast based expert on trauma
  • Siobhan Madden Social Researcher, Feminist Activist speaking about voice, silence, memory and knowledge
  •  Dr Micheline Sheehy Skeffington, speaking about her Grandparents and campaign for gender equality in third level institutions
  • Mary McDermott Radical Educator and Feminist Philosopher who will speak about the interaction betweeen social and personal change
  • These speakers and key themes are interwoven with music, poetry, drama song and dance, and most importantly conversation and tea….
  •  €25.00 per individual for the two days.. plus a light lunch, plus a creche, plus ISL interpreters and for those that cannot afford it we have a limited amount of free tickets….so it would be nice to entice those on the East Coast over to the West for two days.

  • https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/silence-voice-a-festival-of-feminisms-tickets-26309500424.

Talk by Fiachra MacGabhann- Dundalk

For those of you within driving distance of Dundalk town there will be a very interesting talk given by Fiachra Mac Gabhann this Friday June 10th on Irish Place Names.  It will be well worth attending. No booking needed.

 

kilflynn

Kilflynn, Co Kerry……

 

An Archive of Our Past: Placenames and Sense of Place

Speaker: Fiachra Mac Gabhann

Time: 8.00pm

Venue: Wellington Hall, St. Mary’s Road, Dundalk

Date: Friday, June 10th 2016

Organisers: Dundalk Culture Club

 

Toponymy – the study of Place Names – gives us a fascinating and unique access to our past. It connects us to the landscape and nature and is a well­spring of geographical, historical and mythical information.

Fiachra Mac Gabhann presents a talk that will draw on his extraordinary ten­ volume study of the Place Names of County Mayo, Logainmneacha Mhaigh Eo, to examine some of the intricacies of these themes and piece together some of what has been lost, and offer perspectives on the historical and cultural significance of Irish placenames to our sense of identity.

Admission is Free but donations are welcome. 

This event has been organised by the Dundalk Culture Club.

Johnny Murphy Forever

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I am obliged to you. Ah, pardon, it’s I am obliged to you. Its we who are obliged to each other. 

 

Johnny Murphy was an extraordinary talented Dublin artist. He once told me he discovered his talent for performing in the Don Bosco in Crumlin, but I remember seeing Johnny in the many many great productions that the late Deirdre O Connell did at the Focus Theatre. They were the great European classics, Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov. Huge talent on a tiny stage, in a tiny place, bursting at the seams. The passion, the commitment, the drive, the humanity that emanated from Johnny Murphy’s performance was something that I carry to this day. Those days, that stage, that place were shared with other greats, Gabriel Byrne, Ena May, Tom Hickey. These people created a whole new energy which was later harnessed into the Project Arts Centre under the baton of the Sheridan brothers, Jim and Peter who assembled a dynamic bunch of individuals that, in my view, changed the course of Irish acting, Irish performance, Irish playwriting, Irish stage writing and dramatic energy.

Johnny Murphy was a vital part, an essential ingredient, a navigator in all of that.

From Yeats’ work to Beckett’s work to Jim and Peter’s own works, the whole collaboration of the Project Arts Centre all boiled down to one ingredient – the performance of the artist and actors. Johnny Murphy was a star attraction. Not just on that stage, but in people’s lives. He was a very generous, no bullshit person who could cut to the chase. I had some fantastic times with Johnny during my time at the Project and in the many plays and tours that we all did as a company.

I deeply respected and appreciated his guidance, his consideration, his understanding and his generous love and what a funny guy. He was blessed with a marvelous wit and a comic genius. He could hold a stage and an audience anywhere. He could mesmerize with a look.

Nobody, that I know of, has ever forgotten a Johnny Murphy performance. Throughout the last number of years of his life he was as active as you possibly could be, particularly after giving what I believe was one of the most definitive performances in the history of Waiting for Godot, when he played the tragic, fabulous Estragon alongside Barry Mc Govern’s Vladimir at the Gate Theatre.  It was way back in the Project Arts Centre’s production of Waiting for Godot that Johnny first unleashed that performance and interpretation of Estragon to packed houses.

Drimnagh and Dublin are proud of Johnny Murphy.  An artist, a father, a brother and a son. Many of us who also loved Johnny, and I mean loved Johnny Murphy, will grieve and miss him. But we will always be reminded of Johnny as we pass his many haunts, his many theatres, and when his many friends gather in different groups, both now and into the future, to talk and remember.   It was Samuel Beckett who coined the phrase ‘we are born astride the grave, the light gleams for an instant, and then it is night once more’.  John Murphy’s light gleamed brightly in our hearts and in the limelight of the stage forever.  We are obliged to you Mr Murphy.

My deep condolences to his daughter, his family, his many friends and his many audiences.

Johnny, your cue. You’re on.”