Historic Monument- 21 Aungier Street

Aungier Street 21 After

21 Aungier Street, Dublin.  

No 21 Aungier Street is designated under 4 different legal principles; National Monuments and Sites Act, Article 38 protecting all original materials and use, Section 19 Revenue Act amortising costs against tax and access to the public, 2000 planning and Development act on the list of the RPS (Record of Protected Structure)

  • 1992 the building was recognised by Dublin Civic Trust as a late 17th century building.  It was reported to the relevant department and was given status – protective status under the monument and sites act and registered as a National Monument.
  • 1995 The Bord Pleanala reversed the demolition order on it.  Because of its status, an appeal was made to the word and the Bord reversed the decision by DCC and the building was vested in the ownership of the Dublin Civic Trust.
  • 1995-97 Research to prove historic and material significance – the dating of timber frame walls which are very early.  The timber dating of the early staircase to 1680. This is the only full staircase of its kind going up 4 floors with 6 turns in it – it has early pear shaped balustrades the same as the ones in the Royal Hospital.

Number 21 Aungier Street is a substantial late 17th-century mansion one of the oldest recorded buildings in the city, a structure of outstanding architectural and historical significance, built during the 1660s on lands leased by Sir Francis Aungier to Robert Reading, Esq., an influential colleague of the Duke of Ormond, and was subsequently home to the Earls of Rosse, supporters of King James II at the Battle of the Boyne.

The building is a rare surviving example in Dublin of the transition in building technology from late medieval timber framing to brick and masonry construction.

It substantially retains its original plan and layout, consisting of four rooms, arranged around a centrally positioned staircase and two massive chimney stacks, flanked by smaller closet rooms.

The internal walls are timber-framed and are similar in character to those found in Numbers 9- 9A Aungier Street, a 17th-century mansion that has more recently come to light, a building  recognised for its rarity by Dublin City Council, conservation department.

The staircase in No.21 survives intact, it rises six flights through the building, featuring squared newels, a wide heavy handrail and handsome pear-shaped balusters characteristic of the late 17th century and is the only means of accessing the upper floors.

AC34b

Original staircase before renovation

 

Renovation of the building

 

Aungier 21

21 Aungier Street in 1991

 

In 1992, planning permission was granted for demolition of the building, which was subsequently overturned by An Bord Pleanála in acknowledgement of the mansion’s outstanding architectural significance. Through Dublin Civic Trust’s intervention, (then) Dublin Corporation arranged for a site swap with the developer who had originally purchased it from the Corporation, and subsequently vested the property in Dublin Civic Trust in 1995.

The Dublin Civic Trust undertook a major year-long programme of structural stabilisation, conservation and restoration as a pioneering built heritage demonstration project, which was grant aided by Dublin Corporation and the Department of Environment.

This included extensive steel and masonry bracing, reinstating the roof, repointing the late Georgian façade of c.1810, salvaging and refurbishing all original joinery elements, lime plaster wall and ceiling repairs, and the careful reinstatement of windows to exact historic profiles. A stand-out element of the works was the meticulous consolidation and repair of the rare original staircase and timber-framed walls.

Upon completion of the essential conservation works, Dublin Civic Trust sold the property under our Revolving Fund Scheme to a private owner who undertook to complete the building and operate it as a 15-bedroom heritage guesthouse with associated café at ground floor level. The grant of permission for this use (Ref: 2678/96), which operated until approximately the year 2000, was conditioned on reasonable public access being afforded to the first-floor level, in addition to full public access at ground floor level. Under the same grant, a planning condition required an agreement to be signed under Section 38 of the Local Government (Planning and Development) Act 1963 (amended) stipulating the preservation of the original staircase, original timber beams and medieval timber partitions, original free standing chimney stacks, and the restored front and rear walls. A further condition requested that “no further subdivisions of the important ground and first floors shall be permitted.”

  • On completion of the restoration in 1997 the Dublin Civic Trust – the building was launched by the then minister Liz Mc Manus – a section 38 agreement was drawn up protecting all original material identified and stating that this would not be removed or interfered with in the foreseeable future – this was signed by Dublin Corporation.
  • Section 19 under the Revenue act was obtained on the building which entitled a would-be purchaser to amortise the restoration costs against their tax liability. This was subsequently used by the new owner.

Since approximately the year 2000 Number 21 was pressed into unauthorised use as a long-term hostel providing residential accommodation for the Immigration Service, and latterly to the Department of Justice as a step-down facility for young offenders. This use was in breach of the authorised guesthouse use which afforded public access to the property and facilitated the appreciation and enjoyment of its unique heritage features.

Irish Times, March 2nd 2017: Olivia O Kelly

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/historic-monument-in-dublin-to-be-used-for-the-homeless-1.2994185

Irish Times, March 26th 2017: Olivia O Kelly

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/conversion-of-historic-dublin-building-to-homeless-hostel-stopped-1.3020461

Repeal the patronage of the present Artane Band

Tonight before Dublin City Council meeting a motion will be tabled to discontinue the Lord Mayor of Dublin’s patronage of the Artane Band. This band form part of the institutional gulags that are directly connected to the Tuam mother and baby home, the Magdalene Laundry system, the Industrial and reform school system, the orphanages, Bethany Home and the many other sites and centres of injustice to children and women that are scattered around this country.

Please support our campaign to disband the Artane Band.

www.disbandtheartaneband.com

bons-secours

Bon Secours grounds Tuam

DUBLIN CITY COUNCIL

Emergency Motion on behalf of Independent Cllr. Mannix Flynn (IND)

That this meeting of Dublin City Council calls on the Lord Mayor of Dublin, Cllr Brendan Carr, to withdraw the patronage of the Lord Mayor’s Office from the Artane Band.
This patronage causes grave offense and insult to the many who suffered child sexual abuse in the Artane Industrial School, Artane Boys Band and other such Christian Brother Institutions.

It is important to note that the present Artane Band was founded in the Artane Industrial school and continues to wear the insignia and uniform of that industrial school.  Its origins are firmly rooted in the industrial school system and its legacy of crimes against children, further it is still connected to the Christian Brothers organization.

Reasons;.

The Lord Mayor, Cllr. Brendan Carr, has continued to ignore the many who are campaigning for justice with regards to what happened in their childhoods in the Artane Industrial school and indeed the Artane Boys Band, where many young children were sexually, emotionally and physically abused, their suffering continues to this day

For the Lord Mayor and chairman of Dublin City Council to continue to be the patron of the Artane Band is an outrage and will bring Dublin City Council’s reputation into disrepute by supporting the legacy of child abuse that took place in Artane Industrial School and the Artane Band. It is important that Dublin City Council and the office of the Lord Mayor distance themselves from this band and its history, which are well documented in the Ryan Report.

It is not the children who are in the band at present, but rather the band that the children are in, and its association with crimes against children. The institution of the Artane Industrial School and the Artane Band are directly connected to the likes of the Tuam Mother and Baby Homes, the Magdalene Laundry system, the Industrial and Reform School system, the Bethany Home and Orphanage system and form a central part of the architecture of containment that was so unjust.

Dublin City Council in this instance is facilitating further harm and suffering to the many victims of child rape and cruelty perpetrated on them while in the Artane Industrial School, home of the Artane Boys Band.

It is a fact that many of those who were abused and child raped by Christian Brothers were members of the Artane Boys Band, now known as the Artane Band.

Time to repeal the patronage of the present Artane Band in the interest of justice

Cllr. Mannix Flynn

Talk: Art for Parties and Street Theatre, Barcelona 1926–1948 by Xavier Palet Sabater

xavier-at-his-shop

From March 1st-March 5th 2017 Xavier Palet Sabater will set up his exquisite Catalan shop in Dublin at 18 Ormond Quay.  As part of his week-long residency he will be giving a talk on the history of the objects and collectibles along with a workshop (10 persons only) on Saturday 4th March.  See below for details of both.  

TALK: Art for Parties and Street Theatre, Barcelona 1926–1948

Saturday 4th March @ 3pm, 18 Ormond Quay Upper Dublin

The talk will start with an introduction to late-19th-century Barcelona to give an idea of the historical and social context that saw the establishment of El Ingenio, a shop specialising in party favours, street theatre and curious miscellanea. It will then take a tour through the story of the shop from 1880 to 1975, focusing on the years around the Second Spanish Republic, when most of the objects in the collection presented in Dublin were made.

In addition to giving an engaging talk that incorporates objects and costumes rescued from the old workshop, Xavier will also deploy his artistic and theatrical skills to present an original performance.

WORKSHOP: SATURDAY 4TH MARCH 2017 @ 1.30PM – 18 ORMOND QUAY

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Xavier will also run a 1-hour workshop in which he would teach participants how to make different styles of paper hats.

The group would be maximum 10 persons

Participants would need to pay €10 to cover the cost of materials.

 

img-20161230-wa0005Workshop details:

Date: 4th March

Duration: 1 hour

Time: 1.30 pm

Place: adifferentkettleoffishaltogether, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Participants should bring their own scissors ✂

 

Please email: farcryproductionsltd@gmail.com to book your place.  (Only 10 places available)

 

 

Xavier Palet Sabater was born in a small town in L’Empordà, Catalonia. In 2000 he embarked on an artistic career restoring antique furniture and artwork while managing his workshop and the Kamerino shop in Calonge. Since 2007 he has also worked in the field of performance art and theatre, designing, directing and performing his own work at a number of festivals. In 2016 he launched the Kamerino de l’Enginy project in Barcelona.

 

Tim James Morris grew up on the south coast of England to a family with Welsh roots, but has lived for the last 15 years in Barcelona, where he translates for art exhibitions, festivals and other cultural events.

Tim will translate Xavier’s talk and workshop on Saturday 4th March 2017

FarcryLogos.indd

Kamerino: Catalan shop comes to Dublin

KAMERINO POP-UP SHOP. Barcelona

Exclusive five-day sale of a unique collection of handmade pieces from the old workshop of a historic Barcelona shop specializing in party favours and theatrical curios.

You’ll find cardboard masks, hats and instruments, genuine Japanese lanterns, paper toys and a dazzling array of other weird and wonderful objects made between 1926 and 1948.

From Wednesday 1st March 2017 until Sunday 5th March 2017

Open: 10am-6pm daily

Adifferentkettleoffishaltogether, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

The Catalan artist/performer/scenographer/collector and antique furniture restorer Xavier Palet Sabater will set up his exquisite shop at 18 Ormond Quay Dublin 7.  Now the new home of Dublin Civic Trust.  This will be the final event to take place in this historic building before the Trust begin renovations and the scaffolding goes up.

Please call in and visit over the week.  Xavier is selling rare Catalan stock from 1926-1948 and will be giving a demonstration and talk on Saturday 4th March at 3 pm in 18 Ormond.  (Adifferentkettleoffishaltogether)

This is a free event but limited seating – 20 persons

Please email farcryproductionsltd@gmail.com to book a place

img-20161230-wa0003

Kamerino shop, Barcelona

 

 

POP-UP SHOP KAMERINO. Barcelona

Exclusiva venta durante seis días de la inédita colección recuperada de un antiguo almacén de Barcelona dedicado a la fabricación artesanal de artículos de teatro y fiesta entre los años 1926 y 1948.

Podréis encontrar máscaras, sombreros e instrumentos de cartón, auténticos faroles japoneses, juguetes de papel y una infinidad de objetos curiosos…

Además, programaremos una charla teatralizada para dar a conocer el proyecto.

Estaremos en a different kettle of fish altogether, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublín, del 28 de febrero al 5 de marzo de 2017.

Horario: 10 h a 18 h

Encontraréis más información en la página de Facebook Kamerino Collection in Dublin.

 

CAT_0419.JPG

Please join us for Xavier’s workshop on Saturday 4th March at 3pm in 18 Ormond Quay Upper (adifferentkettleoffishaltogether)

 

xavier.jpg  Xavier Palet Sabater was born in a small town in L’Empordà, Catalonia. In 2000 he embarked on an artistic career restoring antique furniture and artwork while managing his workshop and the Kamerino shop in Calonge. Since 2007 he has also worked in the field of performance art and theatre, designing, directing and performing his own work at a number of festivals. In 2016 he launched the Kamerino de l’Enginy project in Barcelona.

 

timTim James Morris grew up on the south coast of England to a family with Welsh roots, but has lived for the last 15 years in Barcelona, where he translates for art exhibitions, festivals and other cultural events.

(Tim will be translating Xavier’s talk on Saturday 4th March)

Further information on the Kamerino Collection in Dublin Facebook page.

Supported by: Dublin Civic Trust/Farcry Productions/The Temple Bar Company/DCCFarcryLogos.indd

Bike Stuff n’ Gadgets awards

Five Smart Projects Receive Funding to Improve Cycling in Dublin

Dublin City Council and Enterprise Ireland announced the winners of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) competition at The House of Lords, Bank of Ireland, College Green this evening.

The competition, which was launched by Smart Dublin last March, sought to find smart technology solutions to help improve and scale up cycling across Dublin. The challenge generated 98 expressions of interest, 23 proposals with 14 dragons den style pitches.

Five companies were selected to receive funding of up to €12,500 and supports from Dublin City Council to research and demonstrate the viability of their smart solution.

bicycle-keating

The chosen companies and their smart solutions are:

 

  • Ambie introducing BikeLook which monitors bicycle usage and deters and detects bicycle theft

 

  • Fluidedge introducing Liberty Bell, a bell that allows cyclists to record actual or perceived obstacles to aid safe cycling in Dublin

 

  • Hindnseek presents a low power device attached to a bicycle that generates real time data with can be integrated with other data sources

 

  • Limeforge Ltd. offers the See.Sense Tracker providing a ‘find your iphone’ like capability allowing cyclists to easily track their stolen bikes

 

  • M2C Smartcharge Ltd. introduces a tracking, logging and data harvesting system for use with bicycles in an urban area aiding the cyclist in predicting the ease of a journey, safety along the way and creating a secure parking facility and the end of the journey

 

Commenting at the announcement Dublin City Council’s Chief Executive, Owen Keegan said “A key aspect of our Smart Dublin initiative is to test new ways for the Dublin Local Authorities to pilot and understand the possibilities of using innovative technologies to solve city challenges.  We are genuinely impressed with the level of ideas that were presented through the SBIR process and look forward to working with these entrepreneurs to pilot and hopefully scale their products using Dublin as a test bed.”

Kevin Sherry, Divisional Manager, Enterprise Ireland commented “Enterprise Ireland is excited to work with Dublin City Council on this initiative, and we congratulate the phase one winners on their innovative solutions which will improve the cycling experience and safety of bicycle users in urban areas.”

David Timoney, Dublin Cycling Campaign who are supporting the initiative added “There are real opportunities to use these new low cost innovations to better understand cycling patterns and experiences.  This in turn will allow for more evidence based decisions by the City on cycling infrastructure. The data will hopefully strengthen the already strong arguments for increased transport spends on cycling.  Furthermore solutions to address cycle theft in Dublin through smart tracker devices have the potential to dramatically reduce bike theft levels currently estimated at a staggering €20,000 per annum in Dublin alone.”

The companies have three months to develop their solution to pre-prototype stage, after which some will be selected for further funding (up to €25,000 each) to complete their prototype solutions.

ENDS

 For further information contact:

Jamie Cudden, Smart City Programme Manager, Dublin City Council M 087 783 5411

Notes to the Editor:

Details of the successful proposals are:

Ambie: BikeLook is a smart city solution to monitor bicycle usage and to deter and detect bicycle theft. Using low power radio (Bluetooth Smart) to track bicycles in the city. Bluetooth trackers’ effectiveness is usually limited by the radio range between the sensor and a mobile phone, but through strategic location of listening posts at bicycle parking, junctions and on street sweepers, the opportunity exists to monitor the volume and direction of cycle traffic in the city.

 

Fluidedge: ‘Liberty Bell’ – A smart bicycle bell that allow citizens who cycle record actual or perceived obstacles to safe cycling in Dublin. Hotspots are highlighted in real-time and authorities are alerted to poor road conditions or poor behaviour by other road users.

 

Hidnseek: A low power device attached to a bicycle that has the ability to generate real time data which can be integrated with existing data sources and information to create an overall accurate picture of the cycling experience in Dublin. The device can measure GPS co-ordinates, speed and environmental conditions using the low cost sigfox network.

 

Limeforge Ltd – See.Sense: The See.Sense Tracker will provide a ‘find your iphone’ like capability using LPWA and GPS, allowing cyclists to easily track their stolen bike anywhere across the city. At the same time, our patent-pending use of sensor technology enables the crowd sourcing of real-time data about cyclist’s journeys over a wide range of variables. Two variants will be created – one for use on personal bikes and one for integration into city bikes alongside our ICON intelligent bike light.

 

M2C Smartcharge Ltd: A tracking, logging and data harvesting system for use with bicycles in a metropolitan area. The system will endeavour to aid the cyclist in predicting the ease of a journey (front end), safety along the way with geographic analysis (Journey Safety) and create a secure parking facility at the end of the journey (destination management)

_________________________________

 

Smart Dublin is an initiative of the four Dublin Local Authorities to engage with smart technology providers, researchers and citizens to solve city challenges and improve city life.

 

Enterprise Ireland is the government organisation responsible for the development and growth of Irish enterprises in world markets. It supports sustainable economic growth, regional development and secure employment.

 

Dublin Cycling Campaign The Dublin Cycling Campaign is an independent, voluntary cycling advocacy group that has been working to improve the city for all cyclists since 1993 www.dublincycling.ie

 

What is Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)? SBIR refers to the public procurement of research and development on new innovative solutions before they are commercially available. It involves different suppliers competing through different phases of development, while the risks and benefits are shared between the procurers and the suppliers under market conditions.

An tAthair Pádraig Ó Fiannachta -Oidhreacht

Tonight celebrate Culture Night and those who make it.

I was privileged to know, and have some of my work translated by, the magnificent Irish scholar, priest, poet, publisher and sage Pádraig O Fiannachta.  His cultural breath still breathes on this great land of ours and its influence gives life throughout the cultural world.

The text below is a translation from our 2006 work ‘Letting Go of That which you most Ardently Desire’ an artwork that dealt with the issue of armed struggle in Irish history and our recent decommissioning process.

An tAthair O Fiannachta passed away in July of this year into the mythical.

                                                  Ní fheicimíd a leithéid arís ann

gunbutts                                      

 

  The Grip That Binds Us

As human beings we are constantly trying to deal and come to terms with internalised trauma.  Being unable or unwilling to resolve certain issues, we cling even tighter to them and, though we yearn for peace and rest and progress, we can’t seem to let go of that which threatens to destroy us.

What is it like to walk away from conflict, to put your weapons beyond use?  To dwell upon all the years committed to the never ending cycle of fright, fight, flight.  Resentment, hatred, fury and denial all form part of the energy field that has dominated us human beings for thousands of years.
Along with the hardware, these emotions need to be deactivated if the grip that has bound us for generations to armed conflict is to be loosened finally and permanently.

Letting go is always a process of loss, a process of grieving. The dawning realisation that you cannot retake what you’ve reconciled to let go of.  And the final, slow acceptance that it is no longer of service to you anyway.
The grip that binds us is a reflective process which offers participants a chance to engage with the emotional dynamics  that underlie letting go and the emergence of something new.

© Gerard Mannix Flynn

Glas-snaidhm orainn

Bímid, mar dhaoine daonna, de shíor ar gor ar chréachtaí inmheánaithe, agus ag iarraidh bheith réidh leo. Toisc nach féidir linn, nó nach toil linn, fadhbanna áirithe a réiteach, is daingne fós ár ngreim orthu; cé go mbímid ag tnúth le síocháin, le suaimhneas agus le dul chun cinn, ní bhíonn ar ár gcumas, de réir dealraimh, scaradh leis an rud seo a bhíonn á bhagairt sinn a scrios.

Conas a mhothaíonn sé cúl a thabhairt le coimhlint, d’airm a chur ó mhaith?
Bheith ag cuimhneamh gan stad ar na blianta gan áireamh gafa ag sceon agus comhrac, tóir agus teitheamh, teitheamh agus tóir.
Tá fuath agus fíoch, fearg agus faltanas i réim i ngarraí treafa polaitíochta Éireann leis na cianta cairbreacha.

Ní hiad na hairm chogaidh amháin atá le cur ó mhaith agus le scrios ach freisin na mothúcháin úd go léir a nasc sinn, glúin ar ghlúin, le cogaíocht an ghunna – táid le scaoileadh go deo faoi dheireadh thiar thall.

Is geall le cailliúint, le caoineadh, i gcónaí rud a scaoileadh uait. Tuigeann tú de réir a chéile nach féidir leat greim a fháil go deo arís ar an rud ar ar réitigh tú scaradh leis. Glacann tú leis de réir a chéile nach aon tairbhe duit é cibé scéal é.

An glas-snaidhm a cheanglaíonn sinn, is próiséas meabhrach é a thugann caoi dóibh siúd a bhíonn páirteach ann dul i ngleic leis na fórsaí mothaithe is bonn don scaoileadh ar shiúl agus do shaolú na nua-bhreithe.

© Gerard Mannix Flynn
Aistriúcháin – Fr. Pádraig Ó Fiannachta

 

 

Disruption of Water Supply – Saturday

Disruption of Water Supply – Dublin  – Saturday 28th May, 2016.

Please see list of areas affected below:

Dublin City Council, working on behalf of Irish Water, advises that, while a repair is being carried out on a large water main, there will be reduced pressures and possible temporary loss of water supply in parts of the city from 08.00am until midnight on Saturday 28th May, 2016. The areas likely to be affected are:

 

Chapelizod, Islandbridge, Infirmary Road, Phoenix Park, Oxmanstown Road, Prussia Street, Grangegorman, Arbour Hill, Phibsborough Road, Broadstone, Constitution Hill and surrounding areas, as shown in the shaded area on the attached map.

 

Dublin City Council will make a number of water tankers available on the day.

The daytime contact telephone number for Saturday is 01 8643634.

After 17:00 hrs the contact number is 01 6796186.

 

Map available at: http://www.dublincity.ie/sites/default/files/content/Press/Documents/islandbridge.pdf