Tuam Babies

 

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Essex Street Site, Temple Bar Dublin -Above, a list of institutions under investigation in the Mother and Baby home  inquiry

 

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Nora at Exchange Street Lower, Temple Bar West

 

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Names of infants buried at Tuam Mother and Baby home

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Talk: Art for Parties and Street Theatre, Barcelona 1926–1948 by Xavier Palet Sabater

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From March 1st-March 5th 2017 Xavier Palet Sabater will set up his exquisite Catalan shop in Dublin at 18 Ormond Quay.  As part of his week-long residency he will be giving a talk on the history of the objects and collectibles along with a workshop (10 persons only) on Saturday 4th March.  See below for details of both.  

TALK: Art for Parties and Street Theatre, Barcelona 1926–1948

Saturday 4th March @ 3pm, 18 Ormond Quay Upper Dublin

The talk will start with an introduction to late-19th-century Barcelona to give an idea of the historical and social context that saw the establishment of El Ingenio, a shop specialising in party favours, street theatre and curious miscellanea. It will then take a tour through the story of the shop from 1880 to 1975, focusing on the years around the Second Spanish Republic, when most of the objects in the collection presented in Dublin were made.

In addition to giving an engaging talk that incorporates objects and costumes rescued from the old workshop, Xavier will also deploy his artistic and theatrical skills to present an original performance.

WORKSHOP: SATURDAY 4TH MARCH 2017 @ 1.30PM – 18 ORMOND QUAY

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Xavier will also run a 1-hour workshop in which he would teach participants how to make different styles of paper hats.

The group would be maximum 10 persons

Participants would need to pay €10 to cover the cost of materials.

 

img-20161230-wa0005Workshop details:

Date: 4th March

Duration: 1 hour

Time: 1.30 pm

Place: adifferentkettleoffishaltogether, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Participants should bring their own scissors ✂

 

Please email: farcryproductionsltd@gmail.com to book your place.  (Only 10 places available)

 

 

Xavier Palet Sabater was born in a small town in L’Empordà, Catalonia. In 2000 he embarked on an artistic career restoring antique furniture and artwork while managing his workshop and the Kamerino shop in Calonge. Since 2007 he has also worked in the field of performance art and theatre, designing, directing and performing his own work at a number of festivals. In 2016 he launched the Kamerino de l’Enginy project in Barcelona.

 

Tim James Morris grew up on the south coast of England to a family with Welsh roots, but has lived for the last 15 years in Barcelona, where he translates for art exhibitions, festivals and other cultural events.

Tim will translate Xavier’s talk and workshop on Saturday 4th March 2017

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Irish Music to watch for on Raelach Records

MUSIC is a universal language, appealing to the very soul of man, and is the outpouring of the heart, whether to express joy or sorrow, to rouse to battle or soothe to sleep, to give expression or jubilation for the living or of wailing for the dead, to manifest sympathy with society or devotion to the Deity. It is, as Thomas Davis writes, “the first faculty of the Irish.
(From A History of Irish Music by William H. Grattan Flood)
Over the past few months, Raelach records have released some of the finest recordings of Irish musicians that I have heard for many years.  On Sunday at City Hall Dublin,  we had the honorary concert for the wonderful Tony MacMahon which coincided with the release of a new album of slow airs. (Farewell to Music – Tony MacMahon)
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Photography and artwork by Maurice Gunning

This Thursday 24th at The Cobblestone, Dublin 1, Raelach Records will be releasing a new album by Jack Talty  called ‘In Flow’.
I have been listening to it all day today and it’s a fantastic collection of tunes, jigs, reels, hornpipes and slow airs.
Guests on the night will include John Blake, Ruairí McGorman, Áine Bird, Aidan Connolly, and Saileog Ní Cheannabháín.
We need to support our musicians, buy their CDs, go see them live and spread the word.  They carry with them in their music our songlines.
 LIST OF UPCOMING CONCERTS 
Saturday, 26 November
Saileog Ní Cheannabháin @
Hoban’s Bar, Westport, Co Mayo
8pm
~
Sunday, 27 November
Jack Talty @
O’Sullivan’s Courthouse Pub, Dingle
9pm
~
Saturday, 3 December
Saileog Ní Cheannabháin + Aidan Connolly @
Holmes’ of Doohoma, Co Mayo
Time to be announced 
~
Sunday, 4 December
Cuar (Neil Ó Loclainn, Aoife Ní Bhriain, Maitiú Ó Báiréil)
+
Danny Diamond @
63 Merrion Square, Dublin 2 (Royal Society of Antiquaries)
4.30pm
€15 incl. glass of wine. Pre-booking advised >
 
 LIST OF CDS AVAILABLE FROM RAELACH RECORDS

Tony Mac Mahon, Farewell to Music

https://raelachrecords.bandcamp.com/album/farewell-to-music

Jack Talty, In Flow 
Aidan Connolly, Be Off 
Saileog Ní Cheannabháin, Roithleán 
Ensemble Ériu, Imbas 

Things to see -Farcry Productions- Culture Night Dublin

If you are heading out into the heart of the city of Dublin tonight for Culture night do check out various sites by  Farcry Productions (www.farcryproductions.ie)

  •  Something to Live For

    Parliament Street/Cork St/Dame Street
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    Something to live for – window’s acknowledging the contribution made by individuals to the establishment of the Irish Republic. Originally installed 2006-2008

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    Pidge Duggen, Ellen Walsh and other great citizens who made this country.

    There has been a special guest put up in one of the windows just for Culture night

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  • Close by the previous installation, you will find SOMEBODY’S CHILD, Essex Street, Temple Bar West.   This work lists the names of the children buried in a pit in Tuam, Bons Secours Mother and Baby home, Co Galway.

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  • THANK YOU – GO RAIBH MAITH AGAT – Georges Street, opposite The George

Proclamation translated into Arabic, Chinese, Gaeilge, French, Polish and Russian.  To find the German translation you will have to walk to The Oak Pub on Dame Street and look up above the door!

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  • CHILDREN TO YOUR FLAG, NEVER IN DARKNESS – Video installation, Dame Street (Stand at the bottom of Georges Street and look up)

A video installation on Dame Street – Georges street of 13 women who contributed greatly to Irish culture, heritage and the establishment of the Irish Republic.

see http://www.1916onehundred.ie/about.html

 

  • Also on the front of the Mercantile Pub, Dame Street you will come across the banners of 7 Women and 7 Men

 

 

 

Women of 1916- Áine Ceannt

The images on this site are from our installation ‘Something to Live for’ situated over the Ivy on Parliament Street and Dame Street Dublin.  The work was first installed in 2006 and has been reinstated for 2016.

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Áine Ceannt (née Brennan) – Something to Live For

 

Áine Ceannt (née Brennan)  1880-1954

Frances O’Brennan is best known by her married name, Áine Ceannt, as the widow of Eamonn Ceannt, one of the leaders of the 1916 Rising.

Frances was born on 23 September 1880, four months after the death of her father, Frank O’Brennan. Elizabeth Butler, Fanny’s mother got a job as a nurse in a workhouse after her husband’s death.

At the turn of the century Fanny joined the Gaelic League and, like many of the other women who became interested in the Irish language, she adopted an Irish name, Áine.  It was in the Gaelic League that she met Eamonn Ceannt. Their first encounter was on an annual excursion to Galway in 1901.  The couple married on 7th June 1905.  Their son Rónán was born on 18th  June 1906. Eamonn worked in the Dublin Corporation.  By 1916, he was the assistant to the City Treasurer and commanded a substantial salary.  He was a committed nationalist; in 1913, he joined the Irish Volunteers as a Private and rose to the rank of Captain.  He was in charge of the South Dublin Union garrison in 1916.

Just before his execution on 8th May 1916, Eamonn Ceannt wrote a last letter to his wife: ‘My dearest wife Áine. Not wife but widow before these lines reach you….Dearest ‘silly little Fanny’ My poor little sweetheart of – how many – years ago…Ever my comforter, God comfort you now.  What can I say? I die a noble death, for Ireland’s freedom…You will be – you are, the wife of one of the Leaders of the Revolution.  Sweeter still you are my little child, my dearest pet, my sweetheart of the hawthorn hedges and Summer’s ever….’

Like many of the other widows, Áine moved into a public role following the Rising. She had been a member of Cumann na mBan from its inception and her sister Lily, was in the Marrowbone Lane garrison. Áine served as vice-president of Cumann na mBan from 1917-1925.  In 1918 she contested the elections for the Urban District Council of Rathmines and was vice-chairman for a period.  During the years 1920-21, she acted as a District Justice in the republican courts in the Dublin suburbs of Rathmines and Rathgar. During the War of Independance, she sheltered men on the run; one of the many who stayed with her was Robert Barton.  She also acted as an arbitrator for the Labour Department of Dáil Éireann in wage disputes throughout the country.

In 1920, she became the founding member of the Irish White Cross allocating funds for the benefit of orphans of wars in Ireland.  By 1941 the office had closed but Áine archived all the papers and wrote a history of the White Cross from 1920-1947. 

From 1939-1947 she was a member of the Red Cross.  Mine died in February 1954. Her funeral took place in her local parish in Dundrum, County Dublin and she was buried in Deansgrange cemetery.

From the installation ‘Something to Live for’ Parliament St/Dame St Dublin by Farcry Productions Ltd.

http://www.1916onehundred.ie

Mrs Kate O Callaghan 1885-1961

Everyday I will post a short biography and image from the ‘Something to Live for’ window installation at Parliament Street/Cork Hill/Dame Street Dublin.

Today is Kate O Callaghan who had a major influence on the cultural life and politics of Limerick City.

 

Kate Murphy was born near Macroom, Cork in 1885. She had 14 brothers and sisters, 11 of whom survived to adulthood. She obtained a degree from the Royal University followed by teacher training in Cambridge. She took up her sister Máire’s post as a teacher in Limerick at Mary Immaculate College.
In July 1914 she married Michael O’ Callaghan and passed her job on to another sister, Éilis. She joined the Gaelic League along with her sisters and was a founder member of the Cumann na mBan Limerick branch . Her jusband became Lord Mayor of Limerick in 1920 and was shot dead by masked men in front of her (believed to be Black and Tans), She was left a widow at 35 years of age. She began a campaign to countermand the authroities ‘version’ that he had been killed by and extreme element of the IRA.  Her pamphlet, The Limerick Curfew Murders,  was circulated in Ireland, England and America.
In 1921 Kate was elected to the Dáil. She opposed the Treaty and in 1922 called for increased women’s suffrage.  She lost her seat in 1923 but remained a very active member of the cultural life of the city and was a member of the Limerick Drama Society, Féile Luimnigh, Limerick Art Gallery and the Gaelic League.  When she died in 1961 members of the old IRA carried her coffin draped with the tri-colour.  She was buried at Mount St Lawrence cemetery next to her husband.

 

Link to The Limerick Curfew Murders http://museum.limerick.ie/index.php/Detail/Object/Show/object_id/11690

The Myth of History

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Glad to see that Margaret Skinneder is being given her rightful place in our history. The women of Cumann na mBan and all the women who gave service and duty to the cause of Irish Freedom are being sidelined in these forthcoming celebrations. The public now have an opportunity to demand, as per the proclamation that they all fought for, that full equality and recognition be given to the women of Ireland and indeed the children of Ireland who gave their lives in the cause of Irish freedom in order to end oppression.

There simply cannot be a two tiered system of commemoration that favours a body of men over a body of women. The example here from the archives shows a deep prejudice and a continued inequality that is still very much part of today.

The commemorative committee of the Government and the commemorative committee of Dublin City Council along with county council throughout the country, who are charged with organizing commemorative events need to be very mindful of these inequalities.A soldier is a soldier, male of female. A revolutionary is a revolutionary.

All too often as in the case for instance of the Algerians who fought in the 2nd world war against the Nazi’s for the French, were sidelined because of race, creed and colour and were never to this day, given full recognition or their pensions.

Addressing these issues will give commemoration and remembrance ceremonies greater meaning and can be instruments in confronting exclusion and championing inclusion.  Above all, it must always be about mans inhumanity to man and that war and violence changes little.  If a person goes out to fight in the hope of a better life and in the victory of that the homeland that they fought for, discriminates against them in favour of the new ruling class as in the case of Margaret Skinneder and her pension rights and parity of esteem, well then all we are doing is continuing the same regimes. The same kind of rule.  The same type of authoritarianism. The same kind of class, gender and economic divide.

The words of the proclamation have yet to see themselves entirely in action.

President Michael D. Higgins address at the Abbey Theatre yesterday, clearly identifies these historical and present fault lines.  Don’t read and weep.  Read and do something.  The above images are just some of the women who gave their lives in death and also gave of their time through out their lives for the Irish people and humanity in general.  We should know them as our own and keep them close in our hearts and in our minds and always attempt to do a little in honour of the lot that they have done.  Learn their names and learn their good deeds.  And we can change this society for the better.  History as a myth…broken.

UN panel grills Catholic church. http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jan/16/un-criticises-vatican-coverups-child-sex-abuse-catholic-priests?CMP=twt_gu

Theatre of Memory Symposium, Abbey Theatre – Irish Independent http://www.independent.ie/entertainment/books-arts/higgins-laments-exclusion-of-women-from-history-29924269.html